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Altovise Ewing, who has a doctorate in human genetics and counseling, now works as a genetic counselor and researcher at 23andMe, one of the largest direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies, based in Mountain View, Calif. Karen Santos for NPR hide caption

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Karen Santos for NPR

Overall in medical research, the proportion of participants with non-European ancestry is only about 20 percent, says Columbia University bioethicist Sandra Soo-Jin Lee. And that's a problem. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

There was an uproar in 2018 when a scientist in China, He Jiankui, announced that he had successfully used CRISPR to edit the genes of twin girls when they were embryos. Prominent scientists hope to stop further attempts at germline editing, at least for now. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies

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Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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Colored scanning electron micrograph of baker's yeast, conventionally grown in the lab. So far, researchers have been able to synthesize six of the yeast's 16 chromosomes from scratch, and think they may be able to complete all 16 by 2018. Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source hide caption

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Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source

Scientists Closer To Creating A Fully Synthetic Yeast Genome

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