Eid Eid

Five-year-old Fatima shows off her Sallah gift in a camp for those internally displaced by the ongoing violence in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State in northeast Nigeria. Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR hide caption

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Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR

In Northeast Nigeria, Displaced Families Celebrate Ramadan's End In Style

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A child stands among the people taking part in Eid al-Fitr prayers in Bucharest, Romania. Members of the country's Muslim community gathered at the massive Dinamo soccer stadium in the Romanian capital. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Vadim Ghirda/AP

This Middle Eastern and Latino infused dessert is a good way to celebrate Eid al-Fatir or beat the summer heat. Ashley Young/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Young/NPR

A Middle Eastern Spin On A Classic Latino Dessert: Rose Cardamom Tres Leches

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Maamoul, a shortbread cookie stuffed with date paste or chopped walnuts or pistachios and dusted with powdered sugar, is the perfect reward after a month of fasting during Ramadan and Lent. These cookies are waiting to be baked. Amy E. Robertson for NPR hide caption

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Amy E. Robertson for NPR