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Unlike Planned Parenthood which pulled out of Title X family planning funding, many clinics still take the funding and must comply with new rules on discussing abortion. Doctors worry it will affect their relationships with patients. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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SDI Productions/Getty Images

Supporters of Planned Parenthood demonstrated at New York's City Hall against the Trump administration's Title X rule change in February. Planned Parenthood now says it clinics nationwide will stop using federal Title X family planning funds. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks at a Feb. 25 news conference in Seattle announcing a lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's Title X "gag rule." Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Abortion-rights activists gathered for a news conference in New York City Monday to protest the Trump administration's proposed restrictions on family planning providers. The rule would force any medical provider receiving federal assistance to refuse to promote, refer for, perform or support abortion as a method of family planning. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Staff members hold an informal meeting before opening the STD free clinic in February in Portland, Maine. The CDC recorded more than 2 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis nationally in 2016 — the highest number of reported cases yet, officials say. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

Under rules outlined in a newly unveiled Trump administration proposal, crisis pregnancy centers and other organizations that do not provide standard contraceptive options, like birth control pills or IUDs, could find it easier to apply for Title X funds. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Under Trump, Family Planning Funds Could Go To Groups That Oppose Contraception

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