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For decades, all research in federally funded laboratories had to use only marijuana grown at a single facility located in Oxford, Mississippi. Brad Horrigan/Hartford Courant/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Brad Horrigan/Hartford Courant/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Scientists welcome new rules on marijuana, but research will still face obstacles

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Franziska Barczyk for NPR

How you can support scientific research

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National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins is stepping down by the end of the year. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Professor with muscular dystrophy working with engineering students setting up adjustable stage at chemical analysis instrument in a laboratory Huntstock/Getty Images/DisabilityImages hide caption

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Huntstock/Getty Images/DisabilityImages

Disabled Scientists Are Often Excluded From The Lab

Scientists and students with disabilities are often excluded from laboratories — in part because of how they're designed. Emily Kwong speaks to disabled scientist Krystal Vasquez on how her disability changed her relationship to science, how scientific research can become more accessible, and how STEMM fields need to change to be more welcoming to disabled scientists.

Disabled Scientists Are Often Excluded From The Lab

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A study of mice that hear imaginary sounds could help explain human disorders like schizophrenia, which produce hallucinations. D-Keine/Getty Images hide caption

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D-Keine/Getty Images

Mice That Hear Imaginary Sounds May Help Explain Hallucinations In People

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A researcher at Peking University's Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics conducts tests on May 14. Scientists are confronting their biases and learning to engage with science from places they're unfamiliar with. Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images

The Pandemic Is Pushing Scientists To Rethink How They Read Research Papers

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Trust In Scientists Is Rising, Poll Finds

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a celebration for scientists and engineers who contributed to the nation's latest nuclear test. KCNA/Reuters hide caption

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KCNA/Reuters

Open Scientific Collaboration May Be Helping North Korea Cheat Nuclear Sanctions

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Tianjin, in northern China, is home to Tianjin University, an international research center that recently hired an American to lead its school of pharmaceutical science and technology. He recruits students from all over the world, he says, and the program's classes are taught in English. Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images

China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students

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Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Bee/Getty Images

How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

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