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Some Republicans see HSAs as a great way of helping consumers deal with mounting medical costs. It's still possible a change to the rules governing who can have an HSA and what they are allowed to cover could be added to another bill, some analysts say. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Donald Trump signs a dollar bill for a supporter during a campaign rally in Richmond, Va., during the presidential campaign. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Tax Bill Could Offer New Way To Funnel Political Cash — And Make It Tax-Deductible

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Proposed changes to the tax law could eliminate the deduction for medical expenses. Those who use it generally have very high medical expenses, often for a disabled child, a serious chronic illness or expensive long-term care not covered by health insurance. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN

Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speak to reporters about the Senate's version of the GOP tax reform bill. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway speaks at a press conference with (from left) Republican Sens. Thom Tillis and David Perdue, and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin on Nov. 7. Only 2 percent of economists polled thought the GOP tax plan would lead to higher growth. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., listen to debate on tax reform on Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Speaker Paul Ryan answers reporters' questions moments after the House narrowly passed a budget, 216 to 212, beginning a process for the Senate to move forward on an overhaul of the tax code. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images