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children's health insurance

Marnobia Juarez came to the U.S. from Guatemala and lives in Maryland. She dreams of getting her green card, but increasingly worries that won't happen under Trump's policy. Juarez was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014 and receives care through a state health program. Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News

The CHIP program provides health coverage to 9 million children from lower-income households that make too much money to qualify for Medicaid. The $2.85 billion Congress allocated in December was supposed to fund CHIP programs in all states through March 31. But federal health officials say it won't stretch that far. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Parents Worry Congress Won't Fund The Children's Health Insurance Program

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Alejandra Borunda, sits with her two children, Natalia, 11, and Raul, 8, holding the family dog at their home in Aurora, Colo. Borunda's children are among those who would lose out if the CHIP program isn't funded. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

States Sound Warning That Kids' Health Insurance Is At Risk

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Protesters rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol in June. Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering 74 million people — more than 1 in 5 Americans. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

The Children's Health Insurance Program relies on money from state and federal governments to help subsidize the cost of medical care for some kids not poor enough to qualify for Medicaid. Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images

Dawn Poole and her husband have to regularly document their family finances to make sure their nine children, who all have complex health conditions, continue to qualify for Medicaid. Courtesy of the Poole family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Poole family

Ben Gapinski, 10, (center) is greeted by his parents Dan and Nancy Gapinski after getting off the school bus. When Ben was a toddler, he was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder and needed constant monitoring to stay safe. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

Wisconsin Family Stays Together With Help From Medicaid

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Roughly 2 million of the kids covered by the Children's Health Insurance Program have a chronic health condition, such as asthma. LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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LSOphoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto