opioid crisis opioid crisis

Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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A young man uses heroin under a bridge in the Kensington section of Philadelphia, a neighborhood that has become a hub for heroin use. The economic costs of the epidemic are mounting, researchers say, as the U.S. loses more and more workers in their prime. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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On Jan. 10, President Trump signed into law the bipartisan Interdict Act, to give federal agents more tools to curtail opioid trafficking. But, after declaring the opioid crisis a public health emergency last fall, Trump has been slow to request money for treatment, critics note. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Says He Will Focus On Opioid Law Enforcement, Not Treatment

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Hydrocodone-acetaminophen pills, also known as Vicodin, arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. A new report from the National Safety Council says the abuse of prescription opioids has helped fuel an epidemic in overdoses. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Hospitals Brace Patients For Pain To Reduce Risk Of Opioid Addiction

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Could Prescription Heroin And Safe Injection Sites Slow The Opioid Crisis?

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George Patterson is one of the volunteers who run Phoenix's only syringe exchange program, a mobile program called Shot in the Dark. Will Stone / KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone / KJZZ

Fight The Opioid Epidemic, All Agree. But Strategies Vary Widely

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U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, shown here testifying before a Senate committee in 2017, says President Trump's top health priority is addressing opioid addiction. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Surgeon General Says Working Together Is Key To Combating Opioid Crisis

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Rep. Tom Marino, R-Pa., was blamed in media reports for sponsoring a bill that the Drug Enforcement Administration had warned would hamper its ability to limit America's deadly opioid crisis. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Tom Marino, Trump's Pick As Drug Czar, Withdraws After Damaging Opioid Report

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Roughly 80 percent of all first strokes arise from risks that people can influence with behavioral changes, doctors say — risks like high blood pressure, smoking and drug abuse. Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Needles at the Alaska AIDS Assistance Association syringe exchange in Anchorage. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Syringe Exchange Program Aims To Slow Hepatitis C Infections In Alaska

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Overdoses from heroin and other opioids have led six states to declare public health emergencies. Marianne Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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From Alaska To Florida, States Respond To Opioid Crisis With Emergency Declarations

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At his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., on Thursday President Trump called the opioid epidemic a national emergency and said his administration was drawing up papers to make it official. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What Could Happen If Trump Formally Declares Opioids A National Emergency

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President Trump and Vice President Pence speak to the press on Thursday at the Trump National Golf Club in New Jersey before a security briefing. Trump said he would declare the opioid crisis a national emergency. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Some medical professionals say declaring a national emergency could make Naloxone, a drug that treats opioid overdoses, more readily available. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Should The Opioid Crisis Be Declared A National Emergency?

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The HHS inspector general found that some 22,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries seem to be doctor shopping for opioids — obtaining large amounts prescribed by four or more doctors and filled at four or more pharmacies. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images
Vivian Shih for NPR

Kids Struggling With Addiction Need School, Too, But There Are Few Options

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Babies exposed to opioids in utero may experience withdrawal symptoms at birth, but these symptoms are treatable. Typically, the babies can go home after a few days or a couple weeks. Getty Images hide caption

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For Newborns Exposed To Opioids, Health Issues May Be The Least Of Their Problems

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A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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