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opioid epidemic

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone, before graduating to heroin, which is cheaper. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Tales Of Corporate Painkiller Pushing: 'The Death Rates Just Soared'

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Leah Esguerra (right), who is credited with being the first social worker installed directly at a public library, strolls through the fifth floor of the San Francisco Public Library's main branch, joined by the library's health and safety associates (from left to right) Sidney Grindstaff, Jennifer Keys and Cary Latham. Jason Doiy/Courtesy of the San Francisco Public Library hide caption

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Jason Doiy/Courtesy of the San Francisco Public Library

Your Local Library May Have A New Offering In Stock: A Resident Social Worker

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Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter begins closing statements during the opioid trial at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla., on Monday, July 15. It's the first public trial to emerge from roughly 2,000 U.S. lawsuits aimed at holding drugmakers accountable for the nation's opioid epidemic. Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman

Pain Meds As Public Nuisance? Oklahoma Tests A Legal Strategy For Opioid Addiction

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Suboxone Film strips dissolve when placed under the tongue and are used to treat patients suffering from opioid dependency. The medication is made by Indivior, which was spun off from U.K.-based Reckitt Benckiser in 2014. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Reckitt Benckiser Agrees To Pay $1.4 Billion In Opioid Settlement

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Insys, the maker of fentanyl-based Subsys, agreed to a $225 million settlement with the federal government to resolve criminal and civil investigations of the company's role in the opioid crisis. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

The presence of the hepatitis C virus in donated hearts and organs for transplantation wasn't an impediment for a successful result for recipients. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images

Hepatitis C Not A Barrier For Organ Transplantation, Study Finds

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Alan Krueger, a Princeton University economist and chairman of former President Barack Obama's Council of Economic Advisers, specialized in workforce economics. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Ex-White House Economist Alan Krueger Dies; Saw Lessons For Economy In Rock Music

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"What's important to me is that the facts come to light, and we get justice and accountability," Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said about litigation that has made internal Purdue Pharma documents public. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Opioid Litigation Brings Company Secrets Into The Public Eye

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U.S. Attorney William McSwain and colleagues announced a civil lawsuit Wednesday in Philadelphia against the nonprofit Safehouse. "We have a responsibility to step in," McSwain says, though he adds, "We're not bringing a criminal case right now." Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Families that lost loved ones to the opioid crisis protested outside Suffolk Superior Court in Boston as lawyers for Purdue Pharma entered the courthouse for a status update in the Massachusetts attorney general's suit against the company on Jan. 25. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Syringes of fentanyl, an opioid painkiller, sit in an inpatient facility in Salt Lake City. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid-related overdoses have contributed to the life expectancy drop in the U.S. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

A Philadelphia police officer holds a package of the overdose antidote naloxone while on patrol in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia in April 2017. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Opioid Antidote Can Save Lives, But Deciding When To Use It Can Be Challenging

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