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opioid epidemic

Insys, the maker of fentanyl-based Subsys, agreed to a $225 million settlement with the federal government to resolve criminal and civil investigations of the company's role in the opioid crisis. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

The presence of the hepatitis C virus in donated hearts and organs for transplantation wasn't an impediment for a successful result for recipients. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images

Hepatitis C Not A Barrier For Organ Transplantation, Study Finds

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Alan Krueger, a Princeton University economist and chairman of former President Barack Obama's Council of Economic Advisers, specialized in workforce economics. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Ex-White House Economist Alan Krueger Dies; Saw Lessons For Economy In Rock Music

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"What's important to me is that the facts come to light, and we get justice and accountability," Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said about litigation that has made internal Purdue Pharma documents public. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Opioid Litigation Brings Company Secrets Into The Public Eye

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U.S. Attorney William McSwain and colleagues announced a civil lawsuit Wednesday in Philadelphia against the nonprofit Safehouse. "We have a responsibility to step in," McSwain says, though he adds, "We're not bringing a criminal case right now." Emma Lee/WHYY hide caption

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Emma Lee/WHYY

Families that lost loved ones to the opioid crisis protested outside Suffolk Superior Court in Boston as lawyers for Purdue Pharma entered the courthouse for a status update in the Massachusetts attorney general's suit against the company on Jan. 25. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Syringes of fentanyl, an opioid painkiller, sit in an inpatient facility in Salt Lake City. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid-related overdoses have contributed to the life expectancy drop in the U.S. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

A Philadelphia police officer holds a package of the overdose antidote naloxone while on patrol in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia in April 2017. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Opioid Antidote Can Save Lives, But Deciding When To Use It Can Be Challenging

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Nine-year-old Gabriella Santamaria holds up a picture of her uncle Stephen who died from a heroin overdose during a 2017 candlelight vigil for victims of drug addiction in Staten Island. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Thirty-year-old Madelyn Linsenmeir, pictured on one of her routine walks with son Ayden. "Her addiction didn't define her, but it did define the way she lived," Linsenmeir's sister, Kate O'Neill, wrote in an obituary that moved readers nationwide this week. Courtesy of Maura O'Neill hide caption

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Courtesy of Maura O'Neill

The Viral Obituary Of An Opioid Addict: 'She's Just One Face' Of The Epidemic

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A man holds a sample of the opioid antidote Narcan during a training session at a New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene office in March. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

Melania Trump talks with a patient at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital in Nashville, Tenn., on Tuesday. The first lady was promoting her Be Best campaign to help children. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Shannon Hubbard has complex regional pain syndrome and considers herself lucky that her doctor hasn't cut back her pain prescription dosage. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Patients With Chronic Pain Feel Caught In An Opioid Prescribing Debate

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More than 2,100 drug felons were denied SNAP benefits in West Virginia in 2016. The number has more than tripled during the past decade. Patrick Strattner/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Strattner/Getty Images

First lady Melania Trump speaks about her "Be Best" initiative in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 7. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

One Month Later, What's Become Of Melania Trump's 'Be Best' Campaign?

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U.S. Postal Service mail vehicles sit in a parking lot at a mail distribution center on February 18, 2015 in San Francisco, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Deadly Delivery: Opioids By Mail

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