climate change and food climate change and food

Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

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Walnut trees at a farm in Byron, Calif. An analysis of nearly 90 studies finds warming temperatures may alter where key crops grow across the state, which provides around two-thirds of America's produce. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images

In 2012, record heat throughout the U.S. farm belt curtailed crop production like this rotting corn on a farm in Bruceville, Ind. Farmers are now worried that the lack of rainfall this year could start the cycle over again. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Warmer temperatures are making canola and possibly other brassica seedpods open too early, reducing crop yields. Andrew Davies/courtesy John Innes Centre hide caption

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Andrew Davies/courtesy John Innes Centre

A cocoa farmer opens cacao pods with a stick to collect cocoa beans at his farm in Beni in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images

Grapes have been growing along the steep slopes of Germany's Mosel River for centuries. Now global warming is shifting the timing of the harvest. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

Climate Change Ripens Prospects For German Winemakers

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While the nutritional value of jellyfish chips hasn't yet been measured, chef Klavs Styrbæk says they pair particularly well with fresh veggies, which could earn them a healthy reputation. Courtesy of Kristoff Styrbæk hide caption

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Courtesy of Kristoff Styrbæk

Coffee is thought to have originated in Ethiopia. Coffea arabica, or coffee Arabica, the species that produces most of the world's coffee, is indigenous to the country. Courtesy of Alan Schaller hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Schaller

Journalist Chris Clayton writes for an audience filled with climate skeptics: farmers and leaders of agricultural businesses. He's telling them that a changing climate will disrupt their lives. Courtesy of Chris Clayton hide caption

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Courtesy of Chris Clayton

Workers prepare to release thousands of fingerling Chinook salmon into the Mare Island Strait in Vallejo, Calif., in 2014. A new report names climate change, dams and agriculture as the major threats to the prized and iconic fish, which is still the core of the state's robust fishing industry. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images