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A young boy looks out from a car as members of a Palestinian family leave Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip with personal belongings on March 31. Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images

Sarah Alfaham and her husband Mohamed Ahmed decorated their home for Ramadan. Courtesy of Sarah Alfaham hide caption

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Courtesy of Sarah Alfaham

Ramadan, A Month About Community For Many Muslims, Goes Virtual

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At the U.S. Capitol an invitation-only iftar, the meal that breaks the fast at sundown each day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, traditionally a time for introspection and goodwill. Hannah Allam/NPR hide caption

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Hannah Allam/NPR

A growing number of Muslim food bloggers and dietitians are trying to address the shifting needs of busy Muslims who want to eat healthy, nutritious meals when breaking fast. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

Gen. Robert Neller, front row fourth from left, at Bait-us-Samad (House of the Eternal) mosque outside Baltimore, Md., Thursday night. The Marine Corps' top general was an Iftar guest at the invitation of Marine veteran Mansoor Shams, fifth from left. Courtesy Mansoor Shams hide caption

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Courtesy Mansoor Shams

Marine Corps' Top General Joins Ramadan Meal

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Young Indian children sit with bowls of porridge (nombu kanji) as they prepare to break the fast with the Iftar meal during the Islamic month of Ramadan at The Wallajah Big Mosque in Chennai last July. Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images