Marawi Marawi
Stories About

Marawi

The skeletal remains of a mosque stand amid overgrown shrubs. Authorities say 25 mosques were destroyed in the district most affected by the five months of fighting between government forces and ISIS militants in Marawi. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Julie McCarthy/NPR

The Philippines' Marawi City Remains Wrecked Nearly 2 Years After ISIS War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/731218264/732270855" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte (on stage in brown) raises a clenched fist as he declares Marawi "liberated" during a ceremony in the Bangolo district of Marawi on Tuesday. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

A man looks on during government airstrikes in the early morning Friday in Marawi. Residents had a brief respite from the fighting Sunday, but gunfire quickly returned to the city after a cease-fire was lifted. Linus G. Escandor ll/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Linus G. Escandor ll/AP

An airstrike rips through a suspected militant hideout in Marawi on Friday. The U.S. is now providing "technical assistance" in the fight to retake the city, according to a Philippine military spokesman. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Philippine army Scout Rangers crouch in a classroom during a mission to flush out militant snipers in Marawi on Tuesday. Using these snipers, human shields and their knowledge of the city, the ISIS-linked militants have continued to maintain their grasp on parts of the city. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images