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Republican primary challenger for Rep. Richard Pombo's seat, former Rep. Pete McCloskey, is shown at his law office in Redwood City, Calif., March 16, 2006. Former California Rep. McCloskey, who ran as a Republican challenging President Richard Nixon in 1972, died on May 8 at age 96. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

This February 2021 photo released by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a protected gray wolf near Yosemite, Calif. California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP hide caption

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California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP

The Key deer is the smallest deer species in North America. The deer live only in the low-lying Florida Keys. They are considered federally endangered, with an estimated population of around 1,000. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A tiny deer and rising seas: How far should people go to save an endangered species?

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Sun-bleached skeletons of long-dead whitebark pine trees stand at the top of a 7,200-foot-high ridge along the Reservation Divide on the Flathead Indian Reservation, Montana. With annual average temperatures in Montana rising, the whitebark pine that were not previously threatened are now facing an increase in blister rust infections, mountain pine beetle infestations and wildfire. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Retired professor Dr. David Etnier (center) and a group of scientists check the state of the snail darter in the Holston River north of Knoxville, Tenn., on April 9, 2008. The U.S. Department of the Interior announced on Tuesday its official removal from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Wildlife. Joe Howell/AP hide caption

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Joe Howell/AP

On May 3, 2022, a partnership led by the Yurok Tribe released two California condors, called A2 and A3, into the wild as part of a decades-long conservation effort." Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe hide caption

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Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

The Quest To Save The California Condor

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President Joe Biden's administration is sticking by the decision under former President Donald Trump to lift protections for gray wolves across most of the U.S. Dawn Villella/AP hide caption

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Dawn Villella/AP

U.S. bald eagle populations have more than quadrupled in the lower 48 states since 2009, according to a new survey from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Protesters march through Midtown Manhattan on Monday as they rally against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Is 8 Enough? The Consequences Of The Supreme Court Starting 1 Justice Short

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A sow grizzly bear spotted near Camas in northwestern Montana. Wildlife officials endorsed a plan in August to keep northwestern Montana's grizzly population at roughly 1,000 bears as the state seeks to bolster its case that lifting federal protections will not lead to the bruins' demise. Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks, via AP hide caption

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Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks, via AP

Grizzlies Have Recovered, Officials Say; Now Montanans Have To Get Along With Them

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Photographed in Walden, Colo., in 2013, greater sage grouse perform mating rituals. The Trump administration is revising a conservation plan for the imperiled species. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Trump Administration Revises Conservation Plan For Western Sage Grouse

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The Wyoming toad population in 1985 totaled 16. Today, there are 1,500 and it remains as one of 12 endangered species in the state. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

Wyoming Toads Begin To Recover As States Seek Endangered Species Act Overhaul

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