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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross stands behind President Trump during a bill signing ceremony at the White House in 2018. Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Judge Orders Trump Administration To Remove 2020 Census Citizenship Question

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Nancy Pelosi of California (third from right), now House speaker, joins fellow Democrats, including Reps. José Serrano of New York and Elijah Cummings of Maryland, as well as other census advocates at a May 2018 press conference in Washington, D.C., about the new citizenship question on the 2020 census. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The printing company R.R. Donnelley & Sons has been selected to print the 2020 census paper questionnaires. The company previously printed forms and envelopes for the 2010 census. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump's nominee for Census Bureau director, Steven Dillingham (center), speaks with Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., at his Oct. 3 confirmation hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

Two senior officials at the U.S. Government Publishing Office, based in Washington, D.C., betrayed "public trust" and eroded employee morale by hiring unqualified workers, including an official's son, the agency's Office of Inspector General said in an internal report. Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar/NPR

Cronyism, 'Wasteful' Spending Accusations Roil Government Publishing Office

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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens stand during a naturalization ceremony in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Census Bureau is planning to test how a question about U.S. citizenship status the Trump administration added will affect responses to the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on Feb. 19 about whether Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross can be deposed for the lawsuits over the citizenship question he added to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross listens to President Trump at the White House in March. Ross' decision to add a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want the question removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How The 2020 Census Citizenship Question Ended Up In Court

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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens gather for a naturalization ceremony at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Trump administration is planning to include a question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross arrives at a U.S. Senate hearing in June. He added a citizenship question to the 2020 census that has sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want it removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) and Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore (right) attend an April event at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. Gore reportedly has testified that Sessions directed the DOJ not to discuss alternatives to the 2020 census citizenship question with the Census Bureau. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross attends a July speech by President Trump in Granite City, Ill. The Supreme Court has temporarily shielded Ross from having to sit for questioning under oath for the 2020 census citizenship question lawsuits. Whitney Curtis/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

Supreme Court Blocks Commerce Secretary Questioning In Census Lawsuits, For Now

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The Trump administration has asked the Supreme Court to block the deposition of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who approved adding the citizenship question to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Steven Dillingham, President Trump's nominee to lead the U.S. Census Bureau, shakes hands with Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., as he prepares to testify during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

Census Bureau Nominee Offers No Opinion On Census Citizenship Question

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Justice Department attorneys are trying to stop Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and DOJ official John Gore from having to testify under oath for the lawsuits over the citizenship question Ross added to the 2020 census. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) speaks with former FBI Director James Comey (center) and other officials at the Department of Justice in April 2017, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (center) listens as President Trump speaks during a meeting at the White House in August. Ross, who oversees the census, approved adding a hotly contested question to the 2020 census that asks, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (left) and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the city and county of Los Angeles, plus four other cities, were joining California's lawsuit over the 2020 census citizenship question in May. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP