2020 Census 2020 Census

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) and Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore (right) attend an April event at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. Gore reportedly has testified that Sessions directed the DOJ not to discuss alternatives to the 2020 census citizenship question with the Census Bureau. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross attends a July speech by President Trump in Granite City, Ill. The Supreme Court has temporarily shielded Ross from having to sit for questioning under oath for the 2020 census citizenship question lawsuits. Whitney Curtis/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

Supreme Court Blocks Commerce Secretary Questioning In Census Lawsuits, For Now

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The Trump administration has asked the Supreme Court to block the deposition of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who approved adding the citizenship question to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Steven Dillingham, President Trump's nominee to lead the U.S. Census Bureau, shakes hands with Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., as he prepares to testify during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

Census Bureau Nominee Offers No Opinion On Census Citizenship Question

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Justice Department attorneys are trying to stop Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and DOJ official John Gore from having to testify under oath for the lawsuits over the citizenship question Ross added to the 2020 census. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) speaks with former FBI Director James Comey (center) and other officials at the Department of Justice in April 2017, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (center) listens as President Trump speaks during a meeting at the White House in August. Ross, who oversees the census, approved adding a hotly contested question to the 2020 census that asks, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (left) and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the city and county of Los Angeles, plus four other cities, were joining California's lawsuit over the 2020 census citizenship question in May. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Officials at the U.S. Government Publishing Office, headquartered in Washington, D.C., showed a "high degree of disregard" for procedures in awarding the 2020 census contract to the bankrupt printing company Cenveo, the agency's Office of the Inspector General found. Samantha Clark/NPR hide caption

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Samantha Clark/NPR

Officials Botched 2020 Census Printing Contract, Report Finds

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The Justice Department has ended the $61 million contract for 2020 census forms that the U.S. Government Publishing Office awarded to the now-bankrupt printing company Cenveo, which has already produced materials for this year's census test run. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Bankrupt Contractor Will Get $5.5 Million For Not Printing 2020 Census Forms

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (right), who approved adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census, listens during a cabinet meeting with President Trump in the White House on July 18, in Washington, D.C. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Rep. Grace Meng, D-N.Y. (center) held a press conference earlier this month outside Manhattan federal court with Liz OuYang (left) of the New York Immigration Coalition and other critics of the new citizenship question on the 2020 census. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

The U.S. Census Bureau hosts public meetings of its advisory committees at the agency's headquarters in Suitland, Md. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Census Bureau Stops Plans For 2020 Census Advisory Committee

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, approved adding a controversial citizenship question to the 2020 census in March. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, appears before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform to discuss the 2020 census, in Washington, D.C., in October 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Documents Shed Light On Decision To Add Census Citizenship Question

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The U.S. government is conducting a test run of the 2020 census in Rhode Island's Providence County, where many noncitizens living in Central Falls, R.I., say they're planning to avoid participating in the national head count. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

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RussellCreative/Getty Images

Many Noncitizens Plan To Avoid The 2020 Census, Test Run Indicates

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John Gore, acting head of the Justice Department's civil rights division, (right) shakes hands with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Washington, D.C., in April. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

An envelope contains a test questionnaire for the 2020 census mailed to a resident in Providence, R.I., as part of the nation's only test run of the upcoming national headcount. A Trump administration plan to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census has prompted legal challenges from many Democratic-led states. Michelle R. Smith/AP hide caption

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Michelle R. Smith/AP