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A newly sworn-in U.S. citizen holds a U.S. flag and documents during a naturalization ceremony in 2018 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Diana Escamilla (center), an organizer with Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights in Los Angeles, poses for a photo with volunteers Angeles Rosales and Janet Mendez in front of a 2020 census outreach campaign poster in Spanish. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Never before has the U.S. census directly asked for the citizenship status of every person living in every household in the United States. A citizenship question that the Trump administration wants on the 2020 census could change that. Above, newly sworn-in U.S. citizens recite the Pledge of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony at Mount Vernon in Virginia. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A sign directs Lyft and Uber riders to a designated pickup location at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Companies That Rely On Census Data Worry Citizenship Question Will Hurt

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The Supreme Court justices are hearing oral arguments Tuesday over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to forms for the 2020 census. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court Appears To Lean Toward Allowing Census Citizenship Question

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A U.S. flag sits on the lap of a newly sworn-in citizen at a 2018 naturalization ceremony in Alexandria, Va. A new appeal in one of the lawsuits over the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census could complicate final preparations for the head count. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

President Trump listens as Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, speaks at the White House. Ross approved including in the 2020 census the question, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A Rhode Island resident holds an envelope he received for the 2020 census test run in Providence County. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

What You Need To Know About The 2020 Census

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Worshippers exiting a mosque in the Bay Ridge neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., are handed fliers encouraging participation in the 2010 census. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

For The First Time, U.S. Census To Collect Responses In Arabic Among 13 Languages

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, straightens his papers during a 2018 Senate hearing in Washington, D.C. Ross is testifying before the House Oversight and Reform Committee about the census on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, with President Trump at the White House in 2018, approved adding to the 2020 census a question asking, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Marines stand guard during the change of command ceremony at Task Force Southwest military field at Shorab military camp in Afghanistan's Helmand province in 2018. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Workers for the 2010 census check computer data during a training session in 2009 in Dummerston, Vt. For the 2020 head count, the Census Bureau is trying to hire around a half million workers in a tight labor market. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

The Census Bureau Needs To Hire Half A Million Workers For The 2020 Count

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The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to take up a sped-up review of a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has agreed to testify at a House oversight committee hearing in March about the citizenship question he approved adding to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

For the 2010 census, the Census Bureau director took a dog sled to complete his trip to Noorvik, Alaska. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Why The U.S. Census Starts In Alaska's Most Remote, Rural Villages

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross stands behind President Trump during a bill signing ceremony at the White House in 2018. Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images