2020 Census 2020 Census

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (left) and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the city and county of Los Angeles, plus four other cities, were joining California's lawsuit over the 2020 census citizenship question in May. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Officials at the U.S. Government Publishing Office, headquartered in Washington, D.C., showed a "high degree of disregard" for procedures in awarding the 2020 census contract to the bankrupt printing company Cenveo, the agency's Office of the Inspector General found. Samantha Clark/NPR hide caption

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Samantha Clark/NPR

Officials Botched 2020 Census Printing Contract, Report Finds

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The Justice Department has ended the $61 million contract for 2020 census forms that the U.S. Government Publishing Office awarded to the now-bankrupt printing company Cenveo, which has already produced materials for this year's census test run. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Bankrupt Contractor Will Get $5.5 Million For Not Printing 2020 Census Forms

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (right), who approved adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census, listens during a cabinet meeting with President Trump in the White House on July 18, in Washington, D.C. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Rep. Grace Meng, D-N.Y. (center) held a press conference earlier this month outside Manhattan federal court with Liz OuYang (left) of the New York Immigration Coalition and other critics of the new citizenship question on the 2020 census. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

The U.S. Census Bureau hosts public meetings of its advisory committees at the agency's headquarters in Suitland, Md. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Census Bureau Stops Plans For 2020 Census Advisory Committee

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, approved adding a controversial citizenship question to the 2020 census in March. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, appears before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform to discuss the 2020 census, in Washington, D.C., in October 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Documents Shed Light On Decision To Add Census Citizenship Question

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The U.S. government is conducting a test run of the 2020 census in Rhode Island's Providence County, where many noncitizens living in Central Falls, R.I., say they're planning to avoid participating in the national head count. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

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RussellCreative/Getty Images

Many Noncitizens Plan To Avoid The 2020 Census, Test Run Indicates

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John Gore, acting head of the Justice Department's civil rights division, (right) shakes hands with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Washington, D.C., in April. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

An envelope contains a test questionnaire for the 2020 census mailed to a resident in Providence, R.I., as part of the nation's only test run of the upcoming national headcount. A Trump administration plan to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census has prompted legal challenges from many Democratic-led states. Michelle R. Smith/AP hide caption

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Michelle R. Smith/AP

Signs sit behind the podium before the start of a press conference in New York City about the multi-state lawsuit to block the Trump administration from adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 census form. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris is among a group of Democratic senators calling for an hearing on the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Wendy Becker (left) and Mary Norton of Providence, R.I., raise their hands after the 2006 Massachusetts court ruling that allowed same-sex couples from Rhode Island to marry in Massachusetts. For the 2020 census, the couple can choose the new response category for "same-sex husband/wife/spouse." Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Getty Images

2020 Census Will Ask About Same-Sex Relationships

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Mulusew Bekele, director of program operations at African Services Committee based in New York City, supports the U.S. Census Bureau's efforts to collect more detailed data on black people's non-Hispanic origins on the 2020 census. "The more refined data, the better for public policy," he says. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

2020 Census Will Ask Black People About Their Exact Origins

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The U.S. Census Bureau says more research is needed before a separate category for people with roots in the Middle East or North Africa can be added to census forms. PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images/iStockphoto

New citizens stand for the U.S. national anthem at a naturalization ceremony in Jackson, Miss., in September 2017. The Census Bureau is considering adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP