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Members of white nationalist groups gathered around a statue of Robert E. Lee during a rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Joshua Roberts/Reuters hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Judge: App User Accused In Planning Charlottesville Rally Can't Keep Identity Hidden

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James Alex Fields Jr. stands on the sidewalk ahead of a rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Later that day he is accused on ramming his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing Heather Heyer. On Wednesday he was charged with federal hate crimes. Eze Amos/AP hide caption

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Eze Amos/AP

DeAndre Harris, on the ground, is assaulted in a parking garage beside the Charlottesville, Va., police station on Aug. 12, 2017, after a white nationalist rally was dispersed by police. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

DeAndre Harris, seen balled on the ground, suffers a beating in a parking garage near the Charlottesville police station after the white nationalist rally last August. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

Virginia State Police Superintendent Steve Flaherty announced his retirement Tuesday after 42 years with the force. Flaherty is pictured here in 2007, briefing the media following the shooting at Virginia Tech. Mannie Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mannie Garcia/AFP/Getty Images

Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas listens earlier this month as an independent report on violence at a white supremacy rally is read at a news conference. Thomas announced his retirement Monday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

White nationalists clash with police as they are forced out of Emancipation Park after the "Unite the Right" rally Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump's cooperation with congressional Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi (left) and Chuck Schumer (center) appears to have won public approval. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

The Rev. Robert Wright Lee, a relative of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, resigned on Monday as pastor from a North Carolina church. Above, Lee speaks at the MTV Video Music Awards in August. Matt Sayles/Invision/AP hide caption

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Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday. The city council voted to cover the statues to symbolize the city's mourning of Heather Heyer, who was killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

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A protester wears a pistol in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating whether to represent potential clients. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Demonstrators march from the courthouse to the jail in Durham, N.C. Dozens of protesters attempted to turn themselves in to law enforcement Thursday in solidarity with those who have been arrested for toppling a Confederate monument earlier this week. Jonathan Drew/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Drew/AP

White supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

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Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

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Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

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Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

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Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/Getty Images

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley wrote, "The Army doesn't tolerate racism, extremism, or hatred in our ranks. It's against our Values and everything we've stood for since 1775." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump walks out of the White House toward Marine One on the South Lawn on Monday. A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds most Americans think Trump's response to Charlottesville events was "not strong enough." Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Faced with a string of resignations from his advisory panels, President Trump has disbanded two groups he had formed to provide policy and economic guidance. He's seen here after a news conference Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Getty Images

People attend the memorial service for Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday. Heyer was killed on Saturday when a man, identified by police as a neo-Nazi supporter, drove his car into a crowd of people protesting against a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images