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Deadly violence from a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., shook the nation in 2017. Since then, city leaders have struggled to define what public discourse should look like as once-marginalized voices increase demands for change. Justin T. Gellerson for NPR hide caption

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Justin T. Gellerson for NPR

'Hear Me By Any Means Necessary': Charlottesville Is Forced To Redefine Civility

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A photo on the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity yearbook page from 1972 shows someone wearing blackface for a costume. Courtesy of Abby Clukey hide caption

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Courtesy of Abby Clukey

U.Va. Students Investigate Their Yearbook's Racist History — Starting With Its Title

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James Alex Fields Jr. was found guilty of killing Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Va., last year. Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail /AP hide caption

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Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail /AP

Star Peterson was injured when a car rammed into a crowd in August, 2017, during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

As Trial Begins In Charlottesville Protest Death, Community Reflects

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White supremacists march through Charlottesville, Va., the night before the "Unite the Right" rally in August 2017. Federal agents have arrested four men on riot charges connected to the rally. Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

DeAndre Harris, crumpled on the ground, is beaten by several men in a parking garage beside the police station in Charlottesville, Va., shortly after a white nationalist rally in August 2017. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

Lindsey Reisser, 25, and her fiance Carl Thomas, 25, bring flowers to the site her friend Heather Heyer died last year at the Unite the Right rally. "Heather was a very close friend of mine," she said weeping. "I asked her not to go. It didn't feel right, there was tension in Charlottesville." Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

Members of white nationalist groups gathered around a statue of Robert E. Lee during a rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Joshua Roberts/Reuters hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Judge: App User Accused In Planning Charlottesville Rally Can't Keep Identity Hidden

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James Alex Fields Jr. stands on the sidewalk ahead of a rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Later that day he is accused on ramming his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing Heather Heyer. On Wednesday he was charged with federal hate crimes. Eze Amos/AP hide caption

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Eze Amos/AP

DeAndre Harris, on the ground, is assaulted in a parking garage beside the Charlottesville, Va., police station on Aug. 12, 2017, after a white nationalist rally was dispersed by police. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

DeAndre Harris, seen balled on the ground, suffers a beating in a parking garage near the Charlottesville police station after the white nationalist rally last August. Zach D. Roberts/AP hide caption

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Zach D. Roberts/AP

Virginia State Police Superintendent Steve Flaherty announced his retirement Tuesday after 42 years with the force. Flaherty is pictured here in 2007, briefing the media following the shooting at Virginia Tech. Mannie Garcia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mannie Garcia/AFP/Getty Images

Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas listens earlier this month as an independent report on violence at a white supremacy rally is read at a news conference. Thomas announced his retirement Monday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

White nationalists clash with police as they are forced out of Emancipation Park after the "Unite the Right" rally Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump's cooperation with congressional Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi (left) and Chuck Schumer (center) appears to have won public approval. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

The Rev. Robert Wright Lee, a relative of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, resigned on Monday as pastor from a North Carolina church. Above, Lee speaks at the MTV Video Music Awards in August. Matt Sayles/Invision/AP hide caption

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Matt Sayles/Invision/AP

City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday. The city council voted to cover the statues to symbolize the city's mourning of Heather Heyer, who was killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

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A protester wears a pistol in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating whether to represent potential clients. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Demonstrators march from the courthouse to the jail in Durham, N.C. Dozens of protesters attempted to turn themselves in to law enforcement Thursday in solidarity with those who have been arrested for toppling a Confederate monument earlier this week. Jonathan Drew/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Drew/AP