charlottesville charlottesville

City workers drape a tarp over the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Emancipation Park in Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday. The city council voted to cover the statues to symbolize the city's mourning of Heather Heyer, who was killed while protesting a white nationalist rally earlier this month. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545548965/545549339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A protester wears a pistol in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. The ACLU says it will consider the potential for violence when evaluating whether to represent potential clients. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Demonstrators march from the courthouse to the jail in Durham, N.C. Dozens of protesters attempted to turn themselves in to law enforcement Thursday in solidarity with those who have been arrested for toppling a Confederate monument earlier this week. Jonathan Drew/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jonathan Drew/AP

White supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542456259/543997993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543980653/544259841" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NurPhoto/Getty Images

Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley wrote, "The Army doesn't tolerate racism, extremism, or hatred in our ranks. It's against our Values and everything we've stood for since 1775." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump walks out of the White House toward Marine One on the South Lawn on Monday. A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds most Americans think Trump's response to Charlottesville events was "not strong enough." Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Faced with a string of resignations from his advisory panels, President Trump has disbanded two groups he had formed to provide policy and economic guidance. He's seen here after a news conference Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sally Elford/Getty Images

People attend the memorial service for Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday. Heyer was killed on Saturday when a man, identified by police as a neo-Nazi supporter, drove his car into a crowd of people protesting against a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

White nationalist Richard Spencer speaks to journalists Monday in Alexandria, Va., just days after three people died amid violence at rallies Spencer attended in Charlottesville, Va. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Former President Barack Obama's tweet after the violence Charlottesville, Va., is now the most-liked tweet ever. The tweet quoted Nelson Mandela and included this photo of Obama visiting a daycare in Maryland. Pete Souza/The White House hide caption

toggle caption
Pete Souza/The White House

Tom Lever and Aaliyah Jones, both of Charlottesville, Va., put up a sign that reads "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park on Tuesday, in Charlottesville, Va. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Rendleman/AP

In December, a Texas A&M student signs a message board ahead of an "Aggies United" event in response to a speech by white separatist Richard Spencer. Spencer was scheduled to return to the school for a "White Lives Matter" rally on Sept. 11. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David J. Phillip/AP

The statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee stands in the center of Emancipation Park the day after violence broke out in Charlottesville, Va. The "Unite the Right" rally aimed to save the statue, which the city council has voted to remove. But several cities have now reacted to the rally by hastening the removal of their own Confederate monuments. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Following the weekend's violent clashes around a white nationalist demonstration in Charlottesville, Va., some are asking what authorities could have done differently. Above, demonstrators and counter-protestors face off at the entrance to Emancipation Park during Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Pastor Daniel Xisto and his son Max, 2, look over a makeshift memorial on Monday for Heather Heyer, who was killed in a car attack on Saturday after a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. While many are calling the attack an act of domestic terrorism, U.S. federal law has no such specific criminal charge. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

Why The Government Can't Bring Terrorism Charges In Charlottesville

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543462676/543477550" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Peter Cvjetanovic (right) chants while holding torches at a march organized by neo-Nazi, white supremacist and white nationalist organizations in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday night. Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images