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deferred action for childhood arrivals

People demonstrate in June in Los Angeles in favor of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Immigrant rights advocates hailed a Friday court ruling allowing new applications as a "huge victory for people who have been waiting to apply for DACA for the first time." Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

The Trump administration implemented new restrictions on DACA applicants following a U.S. Supreme Court ruling ordering DHS to revert to the original guidelines set by President Barack Obama in 2012. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act and others demonstrate outside the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena, Calif., in May. The Trump administration failed to convince a U.S. appeals court that it was justified in ending the program, but a Texas judge on Friday ruled in a separate case that DACA was likely illegal. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., leaves after meeting with reporters before a House showdown on immigration, at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House GOP Leaders Forced To Again Delay Vote On Compromise Immigration Bill

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Supporters of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals protest in Arizona shortly after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the program would be suspended. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Demonstrators urging the Democratic Party to protect the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act (DACA) rally outside the office of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein in Los Angeles last week. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

People attend an orientation class in filing up their application for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Oops, We Lost Your DACA Application

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Faride Cuevas, a participant in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, talks to reporters Wednesday in Seattle as Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson and other DACA participants look on. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Desiree Armas (center) and her parents, Olga and Carlos Armas, left Peru when Desiree was 3 years old. Her immigration status made finding financial aid for college complicated. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

For New Jersey DACA Student, The Road To College Is Bumpier Than Expected

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