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A federal appeals court Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2022, ordered a lower court review of Biden administration revisions to DACA, a program preventing the deportation of hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought into the United States as children. The ruling, for now, leaves the future of DACA up in the air. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Demonstrators hold up signs outside the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals building in New Orleans on Wednesday as a panel of judges heard arguments on the Obama-era program that prevents the deportation of thousands of immigrants brought into the U.S. as children. Kevin McGill/AP hide caption

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Kevin McGill/AP

Luis Grijalva, a student at Northern Arizona University, has qualified to compete at the Tokyo Olympics and represent his home country of Guatemala. But as a DACA recipient he couldn't leave the United States without special permission. Shane Bevel/NCAA Photos via Getty Images hide caption

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Shane Bevel/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

President Biden speaks to reporters on the South Lawn of the White House on July 21 after returning from a trip to Cincinnati. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Pressure Is Building On Biden To Do More For Asylum-Seekers And Migrants

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DACA counted some 636,000 active recipients — sometimes known as DREAMers — at the end of last year. Callaghan OHare/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Callaghan OHare/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Joe Biden signs his first executive orders in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Six of Biden's 17 first-day executive orders dealt with immigration, such as halting work on a border wall in Mexico and lifting a travel ban on people from several predominantly Muslim countries. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Immigration Under Biden, Plus Preet Bharara 'Doing Justice'

What does immigration look like under President Biden? Sam talks to Caitlin Dickerson, staff writer at The Atlantic, about the likelihood Biden can push through policies that other administrations from both parties tried and failed to do. Plus, Sam chats with former federal prosecutor Preet Bharara about his new podcast, Doing Justice, and how the nation's ideas about rules and law have changed in the past few years.

Immigration Under Biden, Plus Preet Bharara 'Doing Justice'

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Javier Maradiaga (far right) with his brother, Jason Castillo; mother, Alma Maradiaga; and sister, Dariela Moncada on Christmas Eve in 2017. Dariela Moncada Maradiaga hide caption

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Dariela Moncada Maradiaga

Santiago Potes is the first Latino DACA recipient to be awarded a prestigious Rhodes scholarship. Santiago Potes hide caption

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Santiago Potes

Santiago Potes Is 1st Latino DACA Recipient To Be Awarded Rhodes Scholarship

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People demonstrate in June in Los Angeles in favor of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Immigrant rights advocates hailed a Friday court ruling allowing new applications as a "huge victory for people who have been waiting to apply for DACA for the first time." Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Iván and his mother, Hilda Ramirez, have taken refuge in a suburban church in Austin, Texas, for more than four and a half years. She says they fled his abusive grandfather in Guatemala five years ago, made it to the Texas border, and asked for asylum from the Obama administration. But she says their treatment under President Trump has been worse. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Sanctuary Immigrants Take Refuge In Texas Church, Watch Election Closely

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The Trump administration implemented new restrictions on DACA applicants following a U.S. Supreme Court ruling ordering DHS to revert to the original guidelines set by President Barack Obama in 2012. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Protesters hold signs at a rally supporting the Supreme Court's ruling to uphold the DACA program on June 18. The Trump administration on Tuesday moved to continue its rollback of the program, despite court rulings. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Administration Refuses To Accept New DACA Applicants Despite Court Rulings

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Author Karla Cornejo Villavicencio. Talya Zemach-Bersin hide caption

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Talya Zemach-Bersin

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients celebrate in front of the Supreme Court after the Supreme Court rejected President Donald Trump's effort to end legal protections for young immigrants, Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Supreme Court Protects Rights For DACA And LGBTQ Workers

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Miriam Gonzalez, shortly after the Supreme Court ruled that DACA could remain in place. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

DACA recipients, including Carolina Fung Geng, (3rd from left), plaintiff Martin Batalla Vidal (center) and Eliana Fernández (3rd from right) hold their fists in the air as they enter the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty

Students and supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals rally in downtown Los Angeles in November while the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments about the program. The court's ruling Thursday will uphold DACA for now. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Some governors are taking notice of the pool of medical professionals in immigrant communities and the bigger role they could play against the coronavirus. Wuttisak Promchoo/Getty Images hide caption

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Wuttisak Promchoo/Getty Images

Passersby open doors to watch videos at an installation titled Common Ground, which shares personal stories of immigrants who are young entrepreneurs, war heroes and farmers in Miami on Oct. 3. The installation, organized by groups that get funding from the Koch network, aims to reframe discussions about the immigration debate. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Searching For 'Common Ground' On DACA

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Demonstrators rallied in Sacramento in May for Medi-Cal expansion to undocumented Californians. When the state's budget was finalized, only young adults up to age 26 were authorized to be included in the expansion. Gov. Gavin Newsom says that's an important first step. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP