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Newer blood tests can help doctors diagnose Alzheimer's disease without a brain scan or spinal tap. But some tests are more accurate than others. Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Tek Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Blood tests can help diagnose Alzheimer's — if they're accurate enough. Not all are

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A large study of an experimental Alzheimer's drug made by pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly & Co. appears to slow worsening of the degenerative brain disease. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

An experimental Alzheimer's drug outperforms one just approved by the FDA

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This illustration made available by the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health depicts cells in an Alzheimer's-affected brain. An experimental drug modestly slowed the brain disease's progression, researchers reported Tuesday. NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP hide caption

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP

A doctor points to PET scan results that are part of Alzheimer's disease research. Much work in the field focuses a substance called beta-amyloid. A new study could test whether that's the right target. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What causes Alzheimer's? Study puts leading theory to 'ultimate test'

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Dr. William Burke reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix in 2018. An experimental Alzheimer's drug from Biogen and Eisai is on the verge of a Food and Drug Administration decision. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Poised For Decision On Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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The squiggly blue lines visible in the neurons are an Alzheimer's biomarker called tau. The brownish clumps are amyloid plaques. Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development

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Phil Gutis with his dog, Abe, who died last year. Gutis, who has Alzheimer's, hoped an experimental drug could help preserve his memories. Courtesy of Timothy Weaver hide caption

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Courtesy of Timothy Weaver

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

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This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune System

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Finding some change in the blood of an Alzheimer's patient that accurately reflects the damaging changes in the brain has been tough. utah778//iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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utah778//iStockphoto/Getty Images