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Researchers say that advanced transmission technologies could help the existing grid work better. But some of these tech companies worry about getting utilities on board - because of the way utilities make money. Julia Simon/NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon/NPR

Researchers say that advanced transmission technologies could help the existing grid work better. But some of these tech companies worry about getting utilities on board - because of the way utilities make money. Julia Simon/NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon/NPR

Why lasers could help make the electric grid greener

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Electric power lines are displayed at sunset in El Segundo, Calif., on Aug. 31, 2022. The FBI charged two men over attacks on Washington state's power grid that left thousands without power. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

A child sips water from a bottle under a scorching sun on Tuesday in Los Angeles. Forecasters say temperatures could reach as high as 112 degrees in the densely populated Los Angeles suburbs in the next week as a heat dome settles in over parts of California, Nevada and Arizona. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images
JEFF PACHOUD/AFP via Getty Images

The Electric Grid-Lock

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People wait in line for Fiesta Mart to open after the store lost electricity in Austin, Texas on February 17, 2021. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images hide caption

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Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

How Giant Batteries Are Protecting The Most Vulnerable In Blackouts

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Snow covers the ground in Waco, Texas, on Feb. 17. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has blamed renewable energy sources for the blackouts that have hit the state. In fact, they were caused by a systemwide failure across all energy sources. Matthew Busch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch/AFP via Getty Images

No, The Blackouts In Texas Weren't Caused By Renewables. Here's What Really Happened

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A worker repairs power lines in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. An outdated, aboveground power grid coupled with a comparative shortage of utility workers have hobbled efforts to restore power in the territory. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Solar cells sit in the sun at the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in Desert Center, Calif. The people who run California's electric grid expect the solar power output to be cut roughly in half during the eclipse. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

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