Hurricane Harvey Hurricane Harvey

"If I smell something out here, it's bad, and I can tell you during Harvey, it smelled real bad," said Juan Flores in Galena Park, Texas, about a leak that caused strong gasoline odors to waft through town. Frank Bajak/AP hide caption

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Frank Bajak/AP

Slow And Upbeat EPA Response To Hurricane Harvey Pollution Angers Residents

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Corey Boyer, a real estate investor, inspects the kitchen of a house flooded after Hurricane Harvey in Humble, Texas. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Real Estate Investors Rush To Buy Houston Homes Damaged By Flooding

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Shannan Wheeler says he suffered chemical injuries on his arms after a fire broke out at the Arkema chemical plant 3 miles from where he lives. He's now part of a lawsuit against the company. William Chambers for NPR hide caption

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William Chambers for NPR

After Chemical Fires, Texans Worry About Toxic Effects

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Yuli Gurriel will be suspended for five games in the 2018 season, and will receive sensitivity training in the off-season. Bob Levey/Getty Images hide caption

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Bob Levey/Getty Images

Museum curator Teddy Reeves demonstrates a method of salvaging damaged photos at a workshop in Beaumont, Texas. Allison Lee/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Allison Lee/Houston Public Media

'All Is Not Lost': These Experts Help Save Hurricane-Soaked Heirlooms

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Water spinach is the main source of income for most Cambodian-American families in Rosharon, Texas. But Vuth Yin says rebuilding his home after flooding from Hurricane Harvey has kept him from farming. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Water Spinach Farmers Struggle To Recover After Hurricane Harvey

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Lindsay Cristides, a master's student in oceanography at Texas A&M University, anchors a research vessel in the Houston Ship Channel before taking samples of sediment left behind by Hurricane Harvey floods. The samples will be tested for contaminants including heavy metals. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Digging In The Mud To See What Toxic Substances Were Spread By Hurricane Harvey

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Filled to the brim by Hurricane Harvey's rainwaters, the Addicks and Barker reservoirs are finally empty once again. In this photo from Sept. 1, days after the hurricane first made landfall, a family looks at floodwaters in the Addicks Reservoir from a closed freeway. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Eric Arjon practices on a circuit board at Lone Star College's new construction trades center in Houston. He is training to become a heating, ventilation and air conditioning technician. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

After Hurricane, Texas School Tries To Meet Demand For Construction Workers

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Flooded houses near Lake Houston on Aug. 30, after the storm called Harvey swept through. Sociologist Clare Cooper Marcus says our homes hold our emotional history — our memories, our hopes, our dreams and pain. In some ways our homes are who we are. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Clockwise from top left: Flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Texas. A victim of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Rescuers search for survivors after the earthquake in Mexico. Monsoon flooding in India. Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images hide caption

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Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images

What The Pileup Of U.S. Disasters Means For The World

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Patrick Bayou, pictured on Sept. 2, flooded when Hurricane Harvey slammed the Houston area. The bayou is a Superfund toxic waste site. A March cleanup report for the site did not include preparations for more severe flood events as a result of climate change. Jason Dearen/AP hide caption

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Jason Dearen/AP

Flooding in Immokalee, Fla., after Hurricane Irma hit was still present days afterward. Public health officials say that even after waters recede, issues such as mold and mosquitos can remain. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Pakistani man and boy walk through floodwaters on Aug. 22, 2010, in the village of Baseera in Punjab. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

The Hidden Cost Of A Disaster? Your Ambition

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Betsy's Pancake House on Canal Street in New Orleans announces its return to business after Hurricane Katrina. Ian McNulty hide caption

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Ian McNulty

A Houston resident walks through waist-deep water while evacuating her home after severe flooding following Hurricane Harvey in north Houston. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

After Hurricane Katrina, Many People Found New Strength

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A smokestack rises in the background over the East Houston community of Manchester, Texas, where the air was heavy with what smelled like gasoline after Hurricane Harvey in late August. The neighborhood is ringed by industrial sites. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Air Pollution From Industry Plagues Houston In Harvey's Wake

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A drone is flown during a property inspection following Hurricane Harvey in Houston. The mass destruction brought on by Harvey has been a seminal moment for drone operators, proving that they can effectively map flooding, locate people in need of rescue and verify damage to speed insurance claims. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images