Hurricane Irma Hurricane Irma

Larry Dimas walks around his destroyed trailer in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Immokalee, Fla., on Sept. 11, 2017. The World Meteorological Organization will no longer use Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate to name hurricanes. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Gabriel Hernandez (left) and Jose Enrique are Puerto Rican chefs named as semifinalists for the best chef of the South category of the 2018 James Beard Awards. The recognition comes as the island's restaurants recover from Hurricane Maria. Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images

Trunk Bay on St. John. The U.S. Virgin Islands were hit hard by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Tourism — a large part of the economy — declined as a result, but people are starting to return. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Visitors Slowly Returning To Virgin Islands After Hurricanes' Destruction

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Hurricane Irma significantly damaged nearly 90 percent of government buildings and the island's electricity infrastructure. Now 87 percent of the island's power has been restored. Garson Kelsick/AP hide caption

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Garson Kelsick/AP

Jared Haley, general manager of the C-Axis plant in Caguas, Puerto Rico, says computer-operated milling machines like this one can cost more than a half-million dollars. Heat and humidity in the plant after Hurricane Maria left many of the machines inoperable, Haley says. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico's Medical Manufacturers Worry Federal Tax Plan Could Kill Storm Recovery

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The Virgin Islands is home to more than 106,000 Americans. More than 33,000 people, which is over a third of the U.S. territory's population, are still awaiting help from FEMA. Ken Thomas/AP hide caption

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Ken Thomas/AP

Storm damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on Sept. 12 in Cruz Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Caribbean Buzz Helicopters via AP hide caption

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Caribbean Buzz Helicopters via AP

Flooded houses near Lake Houston on Aug. 30, after the storm called Harvey swept through. Sociologist Clare Cooper Marcus says our homes hold our emotional history — our memories, our hopes, our dreams and pain. In some ways our homes are who we are. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Employees of Key Fisheries, a Marathon, Fla. fish market that was damaged by Hurricane Irma, clean up debris. Their business is closed to the public due to all the damage done by the storm. Frank Morris/NPR hide caption

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Frank Morris/NPR

Battered By Irma, Florida Fishermen Pin Their Hopes On Stone Crab Season

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Clockwise from top left: Flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Texas. A victim of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Rescuers search for survivors after the earthquake in Mexico. Monsoon flooding in India. Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images hide caption

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Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images

What The Pileup Of U.S. Disasters Means For The World

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Residents of Barbuda were forced to flee when Hurricane Irma devastated their island on its way through the Caribbean. Here, Jackeline Deazle, whose house lost its roof and windows, is seen at a shelter in the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium last week in North Sound, on Antigua. Jose Jimenez/Getty Images hide caption

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Flooding in Immokalee, Fla., after Hurricane Irma hit was still present days afterward. Public health officials say that even after waters recede, issues such as mold and mosquitos can remain. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Nursing homes are required to have emergency plans and have staff practice evacuations, but many fail to meet even those basic requirements. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images