Hurricane Irma Hurricane Irma

Flooded houses near Lake Houston on Aug. 30, after the storm called Harvey swept through. Sociologist Clare Cooper Marcus says our homes hold our emotional history — our memories, our hopes, our dreams and pain. In some ways our homes are who we are. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Employees of Key Fisheries, a Marathon, Fla. fish market that was damaged by Hurricane Irma, clean up debris. Their business is closed to the public due to all the damage done by the storm. Frank Morris/NPR hide caption

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Frank Morris/NPR

Battered By Irma, Florida Fishermen Pin Their Hopes On Stone Crab Season

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Clockwise from top left: Flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Texas. A victim of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Rescuers search for survivors after the earthquake in Mexico. Monsoon flooding in India. Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images hide caption

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Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images

What The Pileup Of U.S. Disasters Means For The World

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Residents of Barbuda were forced to flee when Hurricane Irma devastated their island on its way through the Caribbean. Here, Jackeline Deazle, whose house lost its roof and windows, is seen at a shelter in the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium last week in North Sound, on Antigua. Jose Jimenez/Getty Images hide caption

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Flooding in Immokalee, Fla., after Hurricane Irma hit was still present days afterward. Public health officials say that even after waters recede, issues such as mold and mosquitos can remain. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Nursing homes are required to have emergency plans and have staff practice evacuations, but many fail to meet even those basic requirements. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Nancy and Christian Schneider live in the Holly Lake Mobile Home park, where they haven't had electricity in their home since Hurricane Irma struck Florida over a week ago. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Evacuees at a special needs shelter sit and chat or rest, Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, at Florida International University in Miami, Fla. About 30 people, including staff with the Florida Keys Outreach Coalition for the Homeless from Key West, Fla., were sheltered in a storefront underneath a parking garage on campus. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Miami Hurricane Shelter Still Packed - With People And Pets

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Greg Gatscher, left, and his son, Evan, prepare the house for Hurricane Irma. Little did they know these metal shutters would later become a cooktop. Tara Gatscher hide caption

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Tara Gatscher

A Houston resident walks through waist-deep water while evacuating her home after severe flooding following Hurricane Harvey in north Houston. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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After Hurricane Katrina, Many People Found New Strength

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The sun glares down on a severely damaged apartment unit in a St. Thomas high-rise on Tuesday. Many residents say they lost everything to the Category 5 storm, and days later they're still grappling with how to respond to the rampant destruction. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Police surround the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, which had no air conditioning after Hurricane Irma knocked out a transformer, in Hollywood, Fla. John McCall/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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John McCall/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

Playing pool during a power outage from Hurricane Irma, Lisa Borruso used a headlamp to line up a shot at Gators' Crossroads in Naples, Fla., Monday. Millions of people had their power knocked out by the storm — and some outages will continue for days. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP