hurricane Maria hurricane Maria

Nine days after the Hurricane Maria struck, Emilú De León and other volunteers opened a kitchen to serve meals to the people of Caguas. The first day, they fed 600, De León says. Jenna Miller/Cronkite Borderlands Project hide caption

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Jenna Miller/Cronkite Borderlands Project

Jose Javier Santana says this torn and frayed Puerto Rican flag is representative of the state of the island now — eight months after Hurricane Maria hit. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Study Estimates Hurricane Maria Killed Nearly 5,000, But Barely Makes News

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People are living in homes where roofs, windows, even walls are missing, using blue tarps to keep the elements at bay. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Virgin Islands Still Recovering From 2017 Hurricanes As New Season Begins

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Luis Vázquez placed his shoes at the memorial in remembrance of his father, Luis Manuel Vázquez, who was found dead in his home two weeks after Hurricane Maria. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR

A tree toppled by Hurricane Maria rests over damaged graves in the Villa Palmeras cemetery in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in December 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Study Puts Puerto Rico Death Toll From Hurricane Maria Near 5,000

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A worker from the Cobra Energy Company, contracted by the Army Corps of Engineers, installs power lines in the Barrio Martorel area of Yabucoa, a town where many residents continue without power in Puerto Rico, on May 16. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Rafaela Serrano's house in the municipality of Caguas is still roofless eight months after Hurricane Maria. Countless homes on the island remain damaged two weeks before the start of the next hurricane season. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR

Puerto Rico Officials Say They're Ready For Hurricane Season, But Worries Mount

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A damaged home in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Punta Diamante, Puerto Rico on Sept. 21, 2017. On Monday, Gov. Ricardo Rossello said the majority of federal recovery grants would go toward rebuilding homes and businesses. Jorge A Ramirez Portela/AP hide caption

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Jorge A Ramirez Portela/AP

Don Gregorio has lived all his life in the same home in Humacao, a city on Puerto Rico's eastern coast that was hard-hit by Hurricane Maria. Many of his old friends have since left for the mainland, the former carpenter says, and he feels very alone. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Listless And Lonely In Puerto Rico, Some Older Storm Survivors Consider Suicide

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Hurricane Maria cut power to people across Puerto Rico. On Wednesday, a subcontracting company caused another island-wide blackout, which the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority has been working to fix. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, restorations are being made to a roof in Castañer, a village in Puerto Rico's central mountains. But recovery is slow. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

In A Puerto Rican Mountain Town, Hope Ebbs As The Hardship Continues

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After a lifetime of agricultural work on the U.S. mainland, Ausberto Maldonado retired home to a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. But he has diabetes, and especially since Hurricane Maria, has been struggling to get by. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Time's Running Out For Many Frail, Older People In Puerto Rico

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Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced a deal that would allow billions of dollars in federal disaster recovery loans to start flowing to the hurricane-devastated island. La Fortaleza hide caption

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La Fortaleza

Feds And Puerto Rico Reach Deal Allowing Disaster Recovery Loans To Start Flowing

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Dr. Carla Rossotti (left), a general practitioner, and her health care team leave the home of the their patient, 37-year-old Osvaldo Daniel Martinez. He has the symptoms of a degenerative disease, Rossotti says, but he needs a neurologist's evaluation before he can get proper treatment. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

For One Father And Son In Puerto Rico, A Storm Was Just The Latest Trial

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Von Diaz drew on her experiences in her grandmother's Puerto Rican kitchen and her Southeastern American roots to write her cookbook, Coconuts and Collards. Ella Colley /University Press of Florida hide caption

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Ella Colley /University Press of Florida

Puerto Rican Cooking And The American South Mix In 'Coconuts And Collards'

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Gabriel Hernandez (left) and Jose Enrique are Puerto Rican chefs named as semifinalists for the best chef of the South category of the 2018 James Beard Awards. The recognition comes as the island's restaurants recover from Hurricane Maria. Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images

Trunk Bay on St. John. The U.S. Virgin Islands were hit hard by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Tourism — a large part of the economy — declined as a result, but people are starting to return. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Visitors Slowly Returning To Virgin Islands After Hurricanes' Destruction

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In a photograph taken in October, a resident tries to connect electrical lines downed by Hurricane Maria in preparation for when electricity is restored in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Army reservist Eric Elder, a lineman in civilian life, works with the Corps of Engineers to restore power in the hilly Rio Grande neighborhood east of San Juan. Marisa Peñaloza /NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza /NPR