hurricane Maria hurricane Maria

Don Gregorio has lived all his life in the same home in Humacao, a city on Puerto Rico's eastern coast that was hard-hit by Hurricane Maria. Many of his old friends have since left for the mainland, the former carpenter says, and he feels very alone. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Listless And Lonely In Puerto Rico, Some Older Storm Survivors Consider Suicide

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Hurricane Maria cut power to people across Puerto Rico. On Wednesday, a subcontracting company caused another island-wide blackout, which the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority has been working to fix. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, restorations are being made to a roof in Castañer, a village in Puerto Rico's central mountains. But recovery is slow. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

In A Puerto Rican Mountain Town, Hope Ebbs As The Hardship Continues

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After a lifetime of agricultural work on the U.S. mainland, Ausberto Maldonado retired home to a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. But he has diabetes, and especially since Hurricane Maria, has been struggling to get by. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Time's Running Out For Many Frail, Older People In Puerto Rico

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Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced a deal that would allow billions of dollars in federal disaster recovery loans to start flowing to the hurricane-devastated island. La Fortaleza hide caption

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La Fortaleza

Feds And Puerto Rico Reach Deal Allowing Disaster Recovery Loans To Start Flowing

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Dr. Carla Rossotti (left), a general practitioner, and her health care team leave the home of the their patient, 37-year-old Osvaldo Daniel Martinez. He has the symptoms of a degenerative disease, Rossotti says, but he needs a neurologist's evaluation before he can get proper treatment. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

For One Father And Son In Puerto Rico, A Storm Was Just The Latest Trial

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Von Diaz drew on her experiences in her grandmother's Puerto Rican kitchen and her Southeastern American roots to write her cookbook, Coconuts and Collards. Ella Colley /University Press of Florida hide caption

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Ella Colley /University Press of Florida

Puerto Rican Cooking And The American South Mix In 'Coconuts And Collards'

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Gabriel Hernandez (left) and Jose Enrique are Puerto Rican chefs named as semifinalists for the best chef of the South category of the 2018 James Beard Awards. The recognition comes as the island's restaurants recover from Hurricane Maria. Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images

Trunk Bay on St. John. The U.S. Virgin Islands were hit hard by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. Tourism — a large part of the economy — declined as a result, but people are starting to return. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Visitors Slowly Returning To Virgin Islands After Hurricanes' Destruction

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In a photograph taken in October, a resident tries to connect electrical lines downed by Hurricane Maria in preparation for when electricity is restored in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Army reservist Eric Elder, a lineman in civilian life, works with the Corps of Engineers to restore power in the hilly Rio Grande neighborhood east of San Juan. Marisa Peñaloza /NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza /NPR

Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly recovering after Hurricane Maria. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

After Maria, One Of The World's Best Bioluminescent Bays Slowly Begins To Glow Again

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Miosotis Castro, her husband Francisco Alvarado and their three children lost their home when Hurricane Maria tore through Puerto Rico in September. Eventually they made their way to Providence, Rhode Island, where they've been living with relatives for the last month. John Bender hide caption

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John Bender

For Puerto Ricans Displaced By Maria, A First Christmas Away From Home

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Puerto Rican coquito is traditionally made with a blend of coconut milk, rum and cinammon. The creamy, boozy rum punch is a holiday favorite to sip and to share this time of year. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Matthew Mead/AP

It's Competition Season For Coquito, Puerto Rico's Boozy Holiday Treat

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Puerto Rican merengue singer Joseph Fonseca says he wrote a holiday song about generators to bring joy to people suffering through a long hurricane recovery that has left thousands dependent on generators for power. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

In Puerto Rico, A Generator's Buzz Powers One Singer's Musical Imagination

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A musical group playing traditional Puerto Rican bomba music performs at a parranda in Hartford, Conn. Ryan Caron King for NPR hide caption

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Ryan Caron King for NPR

'We Feel Like Home': Displaced Puerto Ricans Celebrate Traditional Christmas Parranda

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Hurricane Irma significantly damaged nearly 90 percent of government buildings and the island's electricity infrastructure. Now 87 percent of the island's power has been restored. Garson Kelsick/AP hide caption

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Garson Kelsick/AP