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After Columbus wrote the letter in 1493, it was reprinted in Latin and circulated across Europe. Several copies have resurfaced in the U.S., including this one stolen from Venice in the 1980s. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement hide caption

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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

An engraving by W.T. Fry (based on a painting) of Mary Stuart, also known as Mary Queen of Scots, circa 1587. An international trio of codebreakers discovered and decrypted letters she wrote during her years in captivity in England. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

3 amateur codebreakers set out to decrypt old letters. They uncovered royal history

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Morning Edition asked listeners to submit poems in the form of letters to anyone of their choice. The result is this community poem titled "Love, Me." Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

'Love, Me' is a community poem crowdsourced from hundreds of letters

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Mary, Queen of Scots was executed in 1587. Researchers have shed new light on how she safeguarded the final letter that she wrote on the eve of her execution, using a technique known as the spiral lock. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Steve and Neiva Magaña's baby is now 8 months old. Steve has still not met his son in person. KALW hide caption

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KALW

When The Pandemic Closed Prisons To Visitors Loved Ones Picked Up Pen And Paper

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A computer-generated unfolding sequence of sealed letter DB-1538. New research describes how "virtual unfolding" was used to read the contents of sealed letter packets from 17th century Europe without physically opening them. Unlocking History Research Group hide caption

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Unlocking History Research Group

Reading A Letter That's Been Sealed For More Than 300 Years — Without Opening It

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Letters submitted to the "Dear Stranger" project sponsored by Oregon Humanities. Martha Ann Overland/Courtesy Oregon Humanities hide caption

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Martha Ann Overland/Courtesy Oregon Humanities

'Dear Stranger': Connecting People 1 Letter At A Time

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