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Tourists pose for photos in front of the city's welcome sign near Mandalay Bay, which doubled as a memorial site after the shooting last October. On Wednesday, Las Vegas police released more than 1,000 pages of witness statements giving a deeper look into the moments leading up to the massacre. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Damaged windows on the 32nd floor room at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino used by gunman Stephen Paddock are seen on Oct. 2, 2017. Las Vegas police have released some footage from officers' body cameras. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

A small sledgehammer, bullet casings and broken glass are seen in this photo of the interior of Stephen Paddock's room at the Mandalay Bay hotel in Las Vegas, where he carried out a massacre in October. Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department hide caption

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Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

Newly released court documents suggest the Las Vegas shooter's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, acted quickly after the Oct. 1 shooting to conceal her relationship with Paddock. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

The 58 fatalities in October's mass shooting in Las Vegas were all caused by gunshot wounds, the county coroner and medical examiner said Thursday. A makeshift memorial on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip a few days after the shooting has photos of some of those who were killed. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Multiple lawsuits have been filed by victims of the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas. The company that owns the Mandalay Bay, MGM Resorts International, is among the parties being sued. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

More than 50 structures from coast to coast, including the top of 731 Lexington Ave. in Manhattan, seen here, were lit up in orange Wednesday in honor of the Las Vegas shooting victims. Guillaume Gaudet/RXR Realty hide caption

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Guillaume Gaudet/RXR Realty

Jesus Campos, the hotel security guard who was shot the night that Stephen Paddock killed 58 people, gave his first media interview to Ellen DeGeneres. The shooter fired from windows he broke in a suite at the Mandalay Bay, pictured on Oct. 2, the day after the massacre. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images

The parent company of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino had put out a statement that appeared to contradict the police timeline of the mass shooting. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Fifty-eight white crosses for the victims of the shooting on the Las Vegas Strip earlier this month are arrayed Oct. 6 just south of the Mandalay Bay hotel. The shooter fired down on a crowd of concertgoers from a room in the hotel, and on Thursday its parent company disputed the police timeline of the attack. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

A small group prays at a makeshift memorial for victims of the Las Vegas massacre. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Why Finding A Motive After The Las Vegas Shooting Matters

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Madisen Silva, right, and Samantha Werner embrace on Friday at a makeshift memorial for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas. A gunman opened fire on an outdoor music concert last Sunday, killing 58 and injuring hundreds. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

A memorial had been set up for the victims of the Las Vegas mass shooting, which left 58 people dead and nearly 500 injured. Icon Sportswire/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Icon Sportswire/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Salesman Who Sold A Shotgun To Las Vegas Shooter: 'Could I Have Stopped This? No'

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Some of the 58 white crosses for the victims of Sunday night's mass shooting last Sunday, on the Las Vegas Strip south of the Mandalay Bay hotel on Friday. "Their names and their stories will forever be etched into the hearts of the American people," Vice President Pence said while visiting the city on Saturday. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Authorities say the Las Vegas gunman may have considered other music festivals to target, including Chicago's Lollapalooza, shown here in July 2016. Gabriel Grams/Getty Images for Samsung hide caption

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Gabriel Grams/Getty Images for Samsung

President Trump talks with Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman and Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo (right) after arriving at Las Vegas McCarran International Airport on Wednesday to meet with victims and first responders of the mass shooting. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP