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In October 2017, a resident tries to connect electrical lines downed by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja. Puerto Rican officials say electricity has returned to all residents without it after the hurricane. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, right, speaks during a ceremony on Capitol Hill on June 27, 2018. On Thursday, Rosselló demanded the resignation of any member of PREPA's board who refused to cut the new CEO's $750,000 salary. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A worker from the Cobra Energy Company, contracted by the Army Corps of Engineers, installs power lines in the Barrio Martorel area of Yabucoa, a town where many residents continue without power in Puerto Rico, on May 16. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

View of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, on April 18, 2018, after a major failure knocked out the electricity leaving the entire island without power, again. The electricity was eventually restored, but 1.5 percent of customers have had no power in the eight months since Hurricane Maria destroyed the electrical grid. Jose Jimenez/Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Jimenez/Getty Images

In a photograph taken in October, a resident tries to connect electrical lines downed by Hurricane Maria in preparation for when electricity is restored in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Army reservist Eric Elder, a lineman in civilian life, works with the Corps of Engineers to restore power in the hilly Rio Grande neighborhood east of San Juan. Marisa Peñaloza /NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza /NPR