opioid addiction opioid addiction

A pharmacist speaks with a customer at Walmart Neighborhood Market in Bentonville, Ark., in 2014. On Monday Walmart introduced a new set of guidelines for dispensing opioid medications. Sarah Bentham/AP hide caption

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Sarah Bentham/AP

Katiena Johnson stands with her daughter Destini, who was released from jail in August. Katiena and her husband, Roger, took care of their grandchildren while Destini was struggling through her addiction. Destini, 27, recently regained consciousness after suffering a dozen or so strokes as a result of her latest opioid overdose. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Hear Part 1

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Velva Poole works to reunite children with parents who have been grappling with substance use disorder. Mentoring the parents, she says, is a big part of the state-sponsored program's success. Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media hide caption

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Lisa Gillespie/Louisville Public Media

Opioid Treatment Program Helps Keep Families Together

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Francisco Hidalgo prepares to receive a trigger point injection from Dr. Alexis LaPietra (right) at St. Joseph's University Medical Center in Paterson, N.J., while Dr. Tyler Manis observes. An alternative to opioids, the trigger point injection involves dry needling to stop pain from a muscle spasm and a shot of local anesthetic for the soreness from the needle. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

ER Reduces Opioid Use By More Than Half With Dry Needles, Laughing Gas

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A single company, Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, funneled $4.7 million to advocacy groups over the five-year period, according to the report. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

On Wednesday Walmart began distributing a new solution to help customers dispose of leftover opioid prescriptions. But CDC says, just flush them down the toilet. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Proponents of medically supervised, indoor sites for opioid injection say such places would be much safer than tent encampments like this one — and could help people addicted to opioids transition into treatment and away from drug use. Natalie Piserchio for WHYY hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for WHYY

Desperate Cities Consider 'Safe Injection' Sites For Opioid Users

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Terry Lilly, then 36, of Charleston, W.Va., almost a year ago when he was first interviewed by NPR's Sarah McCammon. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

After Drug Treatment, Men In Recovery Work To Live A 'Normal Life'

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