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Forest conservation

An aerial picture shows an illegal mining camp during an operation by the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources against Amazon deforestation at the Yanomami territory in Roraima state, Brazil, on Feb. 24. Alan Chaves/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alan Chaves/AFP via Getty Images

Demonstrators protest the death of an environmental activist, who went by Tortuguita, in Atlanta, in January. Tortuguita was killed Jan. 18 after authorities said the 26-year-old shot a state trooper. R.J. Rico/AP hide caption

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R.J. Rico/AP

A riverside fisherman pulls a captured pirarucu into his canoe in Lake Amanã on Nov. 15. Bruno Kelly for NPR hide caption

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Bruno Kelly for NPR

Rare good news from the Amazon: Gigantic fish are thriving again

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Suzanne Simard is a professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia. Her own medical journey inspired her research into, among other things, the way yew trees communicate chemically with neighboring trees for their mutual defense. Brendan George Ko/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Brendan George Ko/Penguin Random House

Trees Talk To Each Other. 'Mother Tree' Ecologist Hears Lessons For People, Too

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A cedar tree that burned in a recent wildfire, in the Mishmish forest, Akkar, Lebanon. Sam Tarling for NPR hide caption

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Sam Tarling for NPR

Climate Change Closes In On Lebanon's Iconic Cedar Trees

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An Indonesian ranger inspects a peat forest fire in Aceh province in July 2017. Indonesia, unlike most of the world, lost less overall tree cover than usual last year. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP/Getty Images

A gray wolf in Jamtland County, Sweden. A wealthy landowner in Scotland is hoping to bring wolves from Sweden to the Scottish Highlands to thin the herd of red deer. Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Gunter Lenz/imageBROKER RF/Getty Images

Landowner Aims To Bring Wolves Back To Scotland, Centuries After They Were Wiped Out

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Jadav Payeng, "The Forest Man of India," has planted tens of thousands of trees over the course of nearly 40 years. He has made bloom a once desiccated island that lies in the Brahamputra river, which runs through his home state of Assam. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

A Lifetime Of Planting Trees On A Remote River Island: Meet India's Forest Man

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