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Dwayne Tomah, the youngest fluent Passamaquoddy speaker, sings a Passamaquoddy song outside of his home in Perry, Maine. Tomah is translating and interpreting songs and stories from wax cylinders recorded nearly 130 years ago. Robbie Feinberg/Maine Public hide caption

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Robbie Feinberg/Maine Public

Historic Recordings Revitalize Language For Passamaquoddy Tribal Members

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Wim Janssen, one of the musicians involved in the recording project, plays a viola made by master luthier Girolamo Amati in 1615. Courtesy of Native Instruments hide caption

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Courtesy of Native Instruments

An Italian Town Fell Silent So The Sounds Of A Stradivarius Could Be Preserved

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