cryptocurrencies cryptocurrencies
Stories About

cryptocurrencies

STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Poverty, heists, .eth: Coulda been worse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1123605312/1198988406" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
CARL COURT/AFP via Getty Images

The Prudent Man Rule

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1120386248/1198988450" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At the beginning of the pandemic, Michelle Milkowski started investing in penny stocks. A few months later, she bought cryptocurrency for the first time. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kholood Eid for NPR

Amid the hype, they bought crypto near its peak. Now, they cope with painful losses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112439917/1113545259" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A gold plated souvenir cryptocurrency Tether (USDT) coin arranged beside a screen displaying US dollar notes. JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images

A Bitcoin ATM. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Does Bitcoin have a grip on the economy?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107194450/1198988685" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Bitcoin logo is seen during the Bitcoin 2022 Conference at Miami Beach Convention Center in Miami on April 8. Crypto such as Bitcoin have tumbled in recent days as part of a storm hitting all kinds of markets. Marco Bello/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marco Bello/Getty Images

4 things to know as cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin (and stablecoins) melt down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098836853/1098943031" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Francesco Carta fotografo/Getty Images

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gary Gensler testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on Sept. 14 in Washington, D.C. Gensler discussed his approach to the job in a recent interview with NPR. Bill Clark/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Clark/Pool/Getty Images

Why Wall Street's top cop thinks it's time to get tough

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1063573184/1065493864" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

From left to right: Sen. Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyoming; Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gary Gensler; and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. All three are likely to play important roles as the country starts to shape regulations for cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images; Melissa Lyttle/Bloomberg/Getty Images; Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images/Various hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images; Melissa Lyttle/Bloomberg/Getty Images; Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images/Various

A big fight is brewing over cryptocurrencies. These are some key players to watch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1050430801/1053013811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Spinning on the hamster wheel allows Mr. Goxx to select a cryptocurrency to trade. Choosing one of two tunnels to run through allows him to buy or sell. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

This illustration photograph taken on July 19 in Istanbul shows a physical banknote and coin imitations of the Bitcoin cryptocurrency. Regulators such as Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Gary Gensler are promising tougher action for cryptocurrencies. Ozan Kose/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ozan Kose/AFP via Getty Images

Tougher Rules Are Coming For Bitcoin And Other Cryptocurrencies. Here's What To Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1029436872/1029497566" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A sign at the Colonial Pipeline Houston Station facility in Pasadena, Texas, warns against trespassing. Colonial was forced to shut down a key pipeline last month after suffering a ransomware attack. Such attacks are becoming more frequent and increasingly, they are targeting key infrastructure like fuel or food supplies. Fran├žois Picard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fran├žois Picard/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Suffers Over 7 Ransomware Attacks An Hour. It's Now A National Security Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1004684788/1004892757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP via Getty Images

Who Let The Doge(coin) Out?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/965995556/966101336" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks during the unveiling of the new Tesla Model Y in Hawthorne, Calif., on March 14, 2019. Tesla announced on Monday it would invest $1.5 billion in cryptocurrency Bitcoin. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

It Doesn't Get More Buzzy Than This: Tesla Is Investing $1.5 Billion In Bitcoin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/965494932/967291705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Facebook says it will launch a new cryptocurrency called Libra and a digital wallet called Calibra in 2020. Dado Ruvic/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Dado Ruvic/Reuters

Facebook Unveils Libra Cryptocurrency, Sets Launch For 2020

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733701971/733723429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">