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An endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in the Salish Sea west of Seattle in 2014. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Washington Wheat Farmers Could Be Toast If Dams Are Removed To Help Hungry Orcas

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The mother orca, known as J-35, pushes her dead calf to the surface last week off the coast of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The infant orca died shortly after its birth, but its mother has been observed carrying it with her in the days afterward. Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP hide caption

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Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP

A female orca that appears to be grieving has been carrying her dead calf in the water, keeping it afloat since the baby died more than a week ago. Taylor Shedd/Soundwatch, taken under NMFS MMPA permit #21114 hide caption

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Taylor Shedd/Soundwatch, taken under NMFS MMPA permit #21114

A female orca named Wikie swims with a calf in 2011 at Marineland in Antibes, France. Wikie was the central animal in a study, published Wednesday, about orcas' ability to imitate human speech. Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache/AFP/Getty Images