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Derrick Young, co-owner of Mahogany Books in Washington, D.C., says his store has seen new customers in the last year who seem to be "willing to do the work" to educate themselves on issues of race in America. Bonnie Jo Mount/Getty Images hide caption

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Bonnie Jo Mount/Getty Images

A Moment Or A Movement? Black Bookstore Owners On Business One Year Later

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Keitra Bates stands outside of the original location of Marddy's in Atlanta. It's a shared kitchen where home cooks can prepare their goods, and collectively market them. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

'We Don't Have The Luxury To Fall Apart': Black Businesses Get Creative To Survive

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Katie Mitchell, co-owner of Good Books in Atlanta, runs an online and pop-up bookshop with her mom, Katherine. "Things are trendy for a while ... and then they're not," she says. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Thromentta Anderson, the owner of Pass Da Peas in northwest Milwaukee likes to greet customers by name and give them tokens toward free drinks. But he was glad to see new faces during Black Restaurant Week. Alan Greenblatt for NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt for NPR