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"There does seem to be across-the-board understanding that what's happening to patients right now isn't right or fair," Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., said about surprise medical bills. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Matt Gleason fainted at work after getting a flu shot, so colleagues called 911 and an ambulance took him to the ER. Eight hours later, Gleason went home with a clean bill of health. Later still he got a hefty bill that wiped out his deductible. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A Fainting Spell After A Flu Shot Leads To $4,692 ER Visit

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Dr. Paul Davis, whose daughter, Elizabeth Moreno, was billed $17,850 for a urine test and featured in KHN-NPR's Bill of the Month series, was among the guests invited to the White House on Wednesday to discuss surprise medical bills with President Trump. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Sarah Witter fractured two bones in her lower left leg while skiing in Vermont last February. She had two operations to repair the damage. The second surgery was needed to replace a metal plate that broke after it was implanted. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Bill Of The Month: $43,208 For Repeat Surgery To Replace Broken Medical Device

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Shereese Hickson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012 and is unable to work. She supports herself and her son, Isaiah, on $770 a month. Shane Wynn for KHN hide caption

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Shane Wynn for KHN

Chronically Ill, Traumatically Billed: $123,019 For 2 Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

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Janet Winston stands in her rose garden in Eureka, Calif. Testing revealed she is allergic to numerous substances, including linalool. Winston still can handle roses, which contain linalool, but she can't wear perfumes and cosmetic products that contain the compound. Alexandra Hootnick hide caption

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Alexandra Hootnick

Bill Of The Month: A $48,329 Allergy Test Is A Lot Of Scratch

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"The biggest challenge for me was to see how I would be a father again," says Dr. Naveed Khan, who was injured while driving an all-terrain vehicle. "With two able-bodied parents at home, it was easier." Shelby Knowles for NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for NPR

Taken For A Ride: M.D. Injured In ATV Crash Gets $56,603 Bill For Air Ambulance Trip

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The total bill for Drew Calver's four-day hospital stay at St. David's Medical Center in April 2017 was $164,941. His insurer paid $55,840, leaving Calver responsible for the unpaid balance of $108,951.31. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

A survey finds many Americans get unexpected medical bills and the majority come because patients expect their insurance to cover more than it actually does. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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Wren Vetens fought to get her gender confirmation surgery covered after the Group Insurance Board's initial decision left her without insurance coverage. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

Life-Threatening Heart Attack Leaves Teacher With $108,951 Bill

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Wren Vetens was promised a significant discount on the cost of her gender-confirmation surgery if she paid in cash upfront, without using her health insurance. Yet afterward, Vetens received an explanation of benefits saying the hospital had billed her insurer nearly $92,000. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

Bill Of The Month: A Plan For Affordable Gender-Confirmation Surgery Goes Awry

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Angel Dean Lopez and his son Theo both sustained serious injuries to their hands that required surgery and months of occupational therapy. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Father's And Son's Hand Injuries Lead To The Mother Of All Occupational Therapy Bills

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An X-ray of Sherry Young's foot shows the four implanted screws — each of which cost more than a high-end computer. Courtesy of Sherry Young hide caption

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Courtesy of Sherry Young

Eleven days after surgery on her shoulder and foot, Sherry Young of Lawton, Okla., got a letter from her insurance plan saying that it hadn't approved her hospital stay. The letter "put me in a panic," says Young. The $115,000-plus bill for the hospital stay was about how much Young's home is worth, and five times her annual income. Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News

Sticker Shock Jolts Oklahoma Patient: $15,076 For 4 Tiny Screws

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Bill Of The Month: A Tale Of 2 CT Scanners — One Richer, One Poorer

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When Anne Soloviev, a retiree who lives in Washington, D.C., received a prescription to treat toenail fungus, she never thought to ask how much it cost. As it turned out, she was prescribed a topical medication costing almost $1,500. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for KHN hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for KHN

Financial Side Effects From A Prescription For Toenail Fungus

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Urine testing to diagnose illness or to detect the presence of drugs is generally routine. But a woman who gave her doctor a urine sample months after back surgery got socked with a huge bill. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Liz Moreno thought she was done paying for her back surgery in 2015. But a $17,850 bill for a urine test showed up nine months later. Her father, Paul Davis, a retired doctor from Ohio, settled with the lab company for $5,000 in order to protect his daughter's credit history. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

How A Urine Test After Back Surgery Triggered A $17,850 Bill

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