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Austin, Texas, dentist Brad Buckingham received a bill for more than $70,000 after a bike accident landed him in the hospital and he needed emergency hip surgery. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

"There does seem to be across-the-board understanding that what's happening to patients right now isn't right or fair," Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., said about surprise medical bills. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Matt Gleason fainted at work after getting a flu shot, so colleagues called 911 and an ambulance took him to the ER. Eight hours later, Gleason went home with a clean bill of health. Later still he got a hefty bill that wiped out his deductible. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

A Fainting Spell After A Flu Shot Leads To $4,692 ER Visit

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Dr. Paul Davis, whose daughter, Elizabeth Moreno, was billed $17,850 for a urine test and featured in KHN-NPR's Bill of the Month series, was among the guests invited to the White House on Wednesday to discuss surprise medical bills with President Trump. Julia Robinson for KHN hide caption

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Julia Robinson for KHN

Air Methods' helicopter in Pocola, Okla. The company owns five other Oklahoma bases under the Tulsa Life Flight brand that it bought in 2009. Jackie Fortier/ StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/ StateImpact Oklahoma

Will Congress Bring Sky-High Air Ambulance Bills Down To Earth?

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A survey finds many Americans get unexpected medical bills and the majority come because patients expect their insurance to cover more than it actually does. Jamie Grill/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Drew Calver, a high school history teacher and swim coach in Austin, Texas, had a heart attack at his home on April 2, 2017. A neighbor rushed him to the nearby emergency room at St. David's Medical Center, which wasn't in the school district's health plan. Callie Richmond/KHN hide caption

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Callie Richmond/KHN

His $109K Heart Attack Bill Is Now Down To $332 After NPR Told His Story

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Emergencies happen at all hours, but the cost of staffing an emergency department at night is higher than by day, according to emergency care providers. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

Urine testing to diagnose illness or to detect the presence of drugs is generally routine. But a woman who gave her doctor a urine sample months after back surgery got socked with a huge bill. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source