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Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

A Mural Takes On New, Tragic Meaning In A Mourning El Paso

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Broward County Sheriff Gregory Tony, seen in January, has announced the firings of two more deputies over their failure to act during the 2018 shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

In this 2015 photo, then-school resource officer Scot Peterson spoke at a school board meeting of Broward County in Florida. Peterson was arrested on Tuesday and faces 11 charges in the wake of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. Broward County Public Schools via/AP hide caption

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Broward County Public Schools via/AP

Suzanne Devine Clark, an art teacher at Deerfield Beach Elementary School, places painted stones at a memorial outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on the first anniversary of the school shooting Thursday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Broward Sheriff Scott Israel refused to resign for nearly a year but on Friday, he was suspended and replaced by former Coral Springs Police Department Lt. Gregory Tony. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

A report released on Wednesday concluded that a series of security breaches and law enforcement failures allowed an active shooter to kill 17 students and faculty. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Broward County Public Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie (center) speaks to media in February in Parkland, Fla., the day after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. He is flanked by Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel (left) and Florida Gov. Rick Scott (right). Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Ayub Ali, 61, was fatally shot during a robbery at Aunt Molly's Food Store on Tuesday in North Lauderdale, Fla. Courtesy of Mirza Mustaque hide caption

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Courtesy of Mirza Mustaque

First responders transfer patients from ambulances to Broward Health Medical Center in Ft. Lauderdale on the afternoon of Feb. 14. The hospital was on lockdown after receiving victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Jessica Bakeman /WLRN hide caption

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Jessica Bakeman /WLRN

Hospital Lockdowns Can Leave Patients' Loved Ones Locked Out

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Scot Peterson addresses a Broward County school board meeting in 2015. The former school resource officer, criticized for remaining outside during the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., began receiving a monthly pension of more than $8,000 in April. AP hide caption

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AP

Sheriff Scott Israel, holds the hand of Anthony Borges, 15, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in a photo released Feb. 18. Anthony was the last Parkland survivor to be released from the hospital and now his lawyer is preparing a lawsuit against the Sheriff's Office and others in connection with the shooting. Broward County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Broward County Sheriff's Office via AP