russian interference russian interference

Former Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Victoria Nuland testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday about the policy response to Russian interference in the 2016 election and spoke of what other countries may be doing to emulate Russia's tactics. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

With a Twitter post — including a doctored photo that made it appear as if actor Aziz Ansari was encouraging voters to vote from home — displayed behind him, Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn. questions witnesses during an October 2017 Senate hearing on Russian disinformation during the 2016 campaign. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Russian official Alexander Torshin, appearing in Moscow in 2016, was sanctioned by the U.S. government in April, suspending years of travel back to 2009 during which he cultivated ties with American conservatives. Alexander Shalgin/Tass hide caption

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Alexander Shalgin/Tass

Documents Reveal How Russian Official Courted Conservatives In U.S. Since 2009

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Wayne LaPierre, left, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association, speaks at the NRA convention in 2015. A Russian politician who claims to know President Trump through the group says he saw him at that convention. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster spoke at the Munich Security Conference Saturday and said the U.S. "will expose and act against those who use cyberspace" to spread disinformation. Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images