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Venezuela crisis

An anti-government protester walks near a bus that was set on fire by other protesters during clashes between rebel and loyalist soldiers in Caracas, Venezuela, on Tuesday. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Gusmary Añez sits in a tent with two of her children. She and her husband, along with their four children, had been sleeping outdoors in Maicao, a Colombian town near the Venezuelan border. Now they live in one of 60 tents at the camp that house more than 300 Venezuelans. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Venezuelans Find Temporary Lifeline At Colombia's First Border Tent Camp

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Caminantes walk back toward Venezuela on the road between Bogotá and Socorro, Colombia. Thousands cross the border each day. Many head back to their home country after failing to find work or shelter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Chronicles Of A Venezuelan Exodus: More Families Flee The Crisis On Foot Every Day

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Venezuela's power grid crashed on March 7, 2019, throwing almost all of the oil-rich nation's 30 million residents into chaos for nearly a week. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

'New York Times' Journalist Describes An 'Almost Unimaginable' Crisis In Venezuela

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A woman holds a placard reading "We Want Water and Electricity" as she shouts slogans during a protest in Caracas, Venezuela, about a lack of water and electric service during a new power outage in the country on Sunday. President Nicolás Maduro announced a 30-day electricity rationing plan to help as the government works to restore service. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Young men carry luggage from Venezuela into Colombia under the Simón Bolívar International Bridge. Tensions are rising in this border area, where many Venezuelans are seeking refuge and are anxious for change back home. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'Time To Act': Venezuelans Who Fled To Colombia Are Eager To Oust Maduro

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Colombian police escort a Venezuelan soldier into Cúcuta, Colombia. The soldier surrendered at a bridge crossing the Venezuela-Colombia border, where people tried to carry humanitarian aid into Venezuela on Feb. 23. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

1,000 Venezuelan Armed Forces Have Fled Across Border, Says Colombian Government

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Smoke billows from aid trucks set on fire on the Francisco de Paula Santander International Bridge between Colombia and Venezuela, on Feb. 23. Edinson Estupiñán/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Edinson Estupiñán/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuelans take part in a rally in Barcelona, Spain, on Feb. 2 to show support for the movement to push Venezuela's President Nicolás Maduro out of office. Emilio Morenatti/AP hide caption

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Emilio Morenatti/AP

'We're Leaving Out Of Necessity': Venezuelans Top List Of Asylum-Seekers In Spain

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U.S. soldiers direct traffic outside the residence of the Peruvian ambassador to Panama, right rear, in Panama City on Jan. 9, 1990. In December 1989, U.S. President George H.W. Bush sent thousands of troops to Panama to arrest the country's leader, Manuel Noriega. John Gaps/AP hide caption

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John Gaps/AP

Trump's Venezuela Moves Follow Long History Of Intervention In Latin America

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A volunteer carries a bag with U.S. humanitarian aid goods in Cúcuta, Colombia, along the border with Venezuela, on Feb. 8. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Masses Aid Along Venezuelan Border As Some Humanitarian Groups Warn Of Risks

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Opposition leader Juan Guaidó talks to the press as he holds his daughter, Miranda, next to his wife, Fabiana Rosales, outside his home in Caracas on Thursday. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuela's congressional leader, Juan Guaidó, is being recognized by a rising number of countries, including the U.S., as the South American country's interim president. Here, Guaidó (center) speaks to a crowd of opposition supporters at Bolívar Square, in eastern Caracas, last Friday. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

An attendee wears a Venezuelan flag during a rally in Caracas Friday with Juan Guaido, president of the National Assembly, who swore himself in as the leader of Venezuela. Marcelo Perez del Carpio/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Perez del Carpio/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Amid Chaos, Venezuelans Struggle To Find The Truth, Online

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Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino López delivers a message of support for Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela, on Thursday. A half-dozen generals belonging largely to district commands and with direct control over thousands of troops joined Maduro in accusing the United States of meddling in Venezuela's affairs and said they would uphold the socialist leader's rule. Venezuelan Defense Ministry press office via AP hide caption

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Venezuelan Defense Ministry press office via AP

Why Venezuela's Military May Be Standing By Maduro, For Now

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Fishermen wait to help people going to Colombia across the Arauca River near San Fernando de Apure in Venezuela in February 2017. More than 1 million Venezuelans are estimated to be living in Colombia. Juancho Torres/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Juancho Torres/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Fleeing Crisis, Some Venezuelans Are Recruited By Rebel Forces Fighting In Colombia

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Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro takes the oath of office in Caracas, Venezuela, on Thursday. Maduro starts his second term amid international denunciation of his victory and a devastating economic crisis. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

Venezuelan nationals from the city of Tucupita carry household goods that are scarce at home as they walk to board a private ferry back to their country, in the port of Cedros, southwestern Trinidad, June 8, 2016. Andrea De Silva/Reuters hide caption

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Andrea De Silva/Reuters

Trinidad Faces Humanitarian Crisis As More Venezuelans Come For Refuge

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Marcos Carbono (center) joins a protest against the weekend's election in Venezuela in front of that country's consulate in Miami. President Nicolás Maduro may have won the vote count but in the process lost the legitimacy to govern, one expert writes. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images