1968 1968
Stories About

1968

The iconic "Earthrise" image taken by astronaut Bill Anders on Apollo 8 on Christmas Eve 1968. Friday marked the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 8 liftoff. William Anders/NASA via AP hide caption

toggle caption
William Anders/NASA via AP

1968: When Apollo 8 First Orbited The Moon And Saw The Earth Rise In Space

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/679282476/679301536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People attend a party in Cherry Grove section of Fire Island in New York during the 1960s. Courtesy of Cherry Grove Archives Collection hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Cherry Grove Archives Collection

1968: After Dozens Of Acquittals, Police Forced To End Raids On Gay Haven

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676273744/677252508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

It's been 50 years since Philadelphia Eagles fans pelted Santa with snow balls from the stands. Some people say they are ashamed of what happened that day, while others remain unapologetic. Alex Pantling/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Pantling/Getty Images

Philly Frustration, 1968: 'The Day That They Were All Against Everything'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/677015811/677015812" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Harvard University's Bruce Freeman tries to run around a teammate and a Yale player and into the end zone after catching a pass during the final 42 seconds of The Game against Yale University at Harvard Stadium in Boston on Nov. 23, 1968. Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Boston Globe via Getty Images

The Farmington Mine Disaster memorial in Mannington, W.Va., bears the names of the 78 men killed in the explosion on Nov. 20, 1968. Jesse Wright/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Wright/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

How A 1968 Disaster In A Coal Mine Changed The Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/670147046/670449083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Extending gloved hands skyward in racial protest, U.S. athletes Smith and Carlos stare downward during the playing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Those Raised Fists Still Resonate, 50 Years Later

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657548752/657816830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, center, stands Tuesday with Ana Ignacia Rodríguez Marquez, a former leader of the student movement of 1968, at a ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre, at the Tres Culturas square in Mexico City. Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images

What's Changed Since Mexico's Bloody Crackdown On 1968 Student Protests?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653779935/653779936" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The mule train comes into the Washington area against a late afternoon sky in June of 1968. The caravan left Marks, Miss., for the nation's capital on May 13 to participate in the Poor People's Campaign. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bob Daugherty/AP

How A Mule Train From Marks, Miss., Kicked Off MLK's Poor People Campaign

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610097454/610777828" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Britain's Conservative Party politician Enoch Powell, right, listens to two demonstrators in Canada in April 1968, reading a petition that describes him as a "racist." AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

An Anti-Immigration Speech Divided Britain 50 Years Ago. It Still Echoes Today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/603884872/604241540" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fire shoots out from a Baltimore store on Gay Street as looting erupted in a five-block business section in Baltimore on April 6, 1968. Police sealed off the area. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

50 Years Ago Baltimore Burned. The Same Issues Set It Aflame In 2015

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/600114134/600616618" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking to a mass meeting at the Mason Temple in support of striking sanitation workers. Memphis Press-Scimitar/University of Memphis Libraries Special Collections hide caption

toggle caption
Memphis Press-Scimitar/University of Memphis Libraries Special Collections

When MLK Was Killed, He Was In Memphis Fighting For Economic Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/597308044/597750748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On display inside Haleyville City Hall: the red rotary phone that took the first 911 call, surrounded by a display of framed proclamations and newspaper clippings. Andrew Yeager/WBHM hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Yeager/WBHM

How A Sneaky Alabama Town Launched America's 911 System

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/588290949/588372992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">