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A copy of The Birmingham News rests on a rack at the downtown public library in Birmingham, Ala. The company that runs the newspaper and two sister papers says it will permanently stop print publication after Feb. 26, 2023. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

For 3 big Alabama newspapers, the presses are grinding to a halt

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The Tribune Tower, the iconic former home of the Chicago Tribune, seen in Chicago, Illinois in 2015. The newspaper lost a quarter of its staff to buyouts after it was acquired by Alden Global Capital in May. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

When this hedge fund buys local newspapers, democracy suffers

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Selene San Felice's editor, Rob Hiaasen, was killed during the shooting. She was assigned a new editor, and even though their first edit went well, she said, "It felt so bad to get that from somebody that wasn't Rob." She went out in the hallway and cried. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

ANNAPOLIS, MD - JUNE 28: Pat Furgurson (right), a reporter for the Capital Gazette, awaits a press briefing involving today's shooting in Annapolis, Maryland, on June 28, 2018. (Photo by Calla Kessler/The Washington Post via Getty Images) The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Capital Gazette: "I Know He Did It"

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The front page of The Capital Gazette newspaper the day after a mass shooting occured at the paper's office. Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR

Capital Gazette: "A Damn Paper"

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/709554779/710052077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images

Five wooden markers stand in a makeshift memorial outside the Annapolis Capitol Gazette offices in Annapolis, Md., in early July, honoring the employees killed by a gunman just days before. The victims were editor Gerald Fischman, 61; editor and columnist Rob Hiaasen, 59; reporter and editor John McNamara, 56; reporter and columnist Wendi Winters, 65; and sales assistant Rebecca Smith, 34. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Public radio stations WNYC, KPCC and WAMU announced Friday that they will revive the Gothamist local news sites in their cities. The sites had been shuttered by owner Joe Ricketts in November. WNYC hide caption

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WNYC