Gina Haspel Gina Haspel

Kelly Sadler, shown in March, is no longer employed as a special assistant to President Trump. Last month, after Sen. John McCain urged senators to vote against Gina Haspel's nomination to head the CIA, Sadler reportedly said, "It doesn't matter, he's dying anyway." Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Gina Haspel is sworn in to testify at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee in Washington on May 9. The full Senate on Thursday confirmed Haspel as CIA director, making her the first woman to hold the job. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Gina Haspel (in white), the nominee to lead the CIA, is welcomed at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. (seated), and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., in Washington on May 9. The committee voted 10-5 on Wednesday to recommend Haspel's confirmation by the full Senate. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Panel Approves Gina Haspel As CIA Chief; Confirmation Appears Likely

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Gina Haspel, the nominee to be CIA director, testifies at a Senate intelligence committee hearing on May 9. Haspel now appears to have enough Senate support to win confirmation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

CIA nominee Gina Haspel testifies before the Senate intelligence committee on Wednesday. Alleged Sept. 11 planner Khalid Sheikh Mohammed says he has information that could be relevant to her nomination. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

CIA director nominee Gina Haspel attends Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's ceremonial swearing-in at the State Department in Washington last week. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

CIA Nominee Gina Haspel Faces A Senate Showdown

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Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. CIA via AP hide caption

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CIA via AP

The CIA Introduces Gina Haspel After Her Long Career Undercover

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Deputy Director Gina Haspel joined the agency in 1985. President Trump tweeted this month that he would nominate CIA Director Mike Pompeo to be the new secretary of state and Haspel to replace him. CIA via AP hide caption

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CIA via AP

ProPublica has issued a correction and apology for its 2017 article about Gina Haspel, a CIA veteran who is President Trump's pick to head the CIA. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

ProPublica Corrects Its Story On Trump's CIA Nominee Gina Haspel And Waterboarding

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Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. AP via CIA hide caption

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AP via CIA