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Honor guards attend a flag-raising ceremony at Tiananmen Square in 2017. Under President Xi Jinping, China has ambitiously pressed its advantage almost everywhere at once. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

China Unbound: What An Emboldened China Means For The World

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Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and other USDA officials say the aid will be available in three forms; direct payments; government purchases for distribution to food banks; and development of new export markets. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Trump Administration Plans $12 Billion In Farm Aid To Offset Tariffs

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A Chinese worker looks on as a cargo ship is loaded at a port in Qingdao, in eastern China's Shandong province, in July 2017. The United States is China's biggest single export market. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

China Is Better Able To Withstand A Trade War Than In The Past

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The steel used to build lobster traps like these, stacked up outside a fish market on Martha's Vineyard, is getting pricier, thanks to new tariffs. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Got Lobster? Trump's Steel Tariffs Threaten Trap Industry

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A single soybean plant grows in a field in the village of Sandaogou, China. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

China Tells Farmers To Grow More Soybeans Amid Trade Fight With U.S.

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A residential building in Dandong, a city near China's northeast border with North Korea. Local authorities have tried to curb speculation in the property market. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

Real Estate Jumps In Chinese City Bordering North Korea

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A visitor to the 21st China Beijing International High-Tech Expo looks at a computer chip through a microscope. The White House said Tuesday that it will impose tariffs on $50 billion in imports from China containing "industrially significant technology." Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

A tourist takes photos of Tower 101 in Taipei in 2013. Policy experts say the Taiwan Travel Act is a provocation for China because more visits to Taiwan by high-ranking U.S. officials could help boost the island's international profile. Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images

In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers his opening speech at the Boao Forum for Asia Annual Conference in Boao in south China's Hainan province, on Tuesday. Li Xueren/AP hide caption

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Li Xueren/AP

Traders and financial professionals work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange ahead of the opening bell. Investors' worries about a trade war increased Wednesday after China announced plans to retaliate against U.S. tariffs. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

China currently buys nearly a third of the U.S. soybean crop — but the country plans to impose tariffs, in response to a Trump administration plan. Here, a worker takes a sample from a truckload of soybeans in Fargo, N.D., last December. Dan Koeck/Reuters hide caption

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Dan Koeck/Reuters