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A Rhode Island resident holds an envelope he received for the 2020 census test run in Providence County. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

What You Need To Know About The 2020 Census

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, straightens his papers during a 2018 Senate hearing in Washington, D.C. Ross is testifying before the House Oversight and Reform Committee about the census on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, with President Trump at the White House in 2018, approved adding to the 2020 census a question asking, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Workers for the 2010 census check computer data during a training session in 2009 in Dummerston, Vt. For the 2020 head count, the Census Bureau is trying to hire around a half million workers in a tight labor market. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

The Census Bureau Needs To Hire Half A Million Workers For The 2020 Count

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The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to take up a sped-up review of a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has agreed to testify at a House oversight committee hearing in March about the citizenship question he approved adding to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross stands behind President Trump during a bill signing ceremony at the White House in 2018. Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Judge Orders Trump Administration To Remove 2020 Census Citizenship Question

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Nancy Pelosi of California, now House speaker, joins fellow Democrats, including Reps. José Serrano of New York and Elijah Cummings of Maryland, as well as other census advocates at a May 2018 press conference in Washington, D.C., about the new citizenship question on the 2020 census. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Trump's nominee for Census Bureau director, Steven Dillingham (center), speaks with Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., at his Oct. 3 confirmation hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens stand during a naturalization ceremony in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Census Bureau is planning to test how a question about U.S. citizenship status the Trump administration added will affect responses to the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on Feb. 19 about whether Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross can be deposed for the lawsuits over the citizenship question he added to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross listens to President Trump at the White House in March. Ross' decision to add a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want the question removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How The 2020 Census Citizenship Question Ended Up In Court

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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens gather for a naturalization ceremony at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Trump administration is planning to include a question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross arrives at a U.S. Senate hearing in June. He added a citizenship question to the 2020 census that has sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want it removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) and Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore (right) attend an April event at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. Gore reportedly has testified that Sessions directed the DOJ not to discuss alternatives to the 2020 census citizenship question with the Census Bureau. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross attends a July speech by President Trump in Granite City, Ill. The Supreme Court has temporarily shielded Ross from having to sit for questioning under oath for the 2020 census citizenship question lawsuits. Whitney Curtis/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Curtis/Getty Images

Supreme Court Blocks Commerce Secretary Questioning In Census Lawsuits, For Now

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The Trump administration has asked the Supreme Court to block the deposition of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who approved adding the citizenship question to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Steven Dillingham, President Trump's nominee to lead the U.S. Census Bureau, shakes hands with Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., as he prepares to testify during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

Census Bureau Nominee Offers No Opinion On Census Citizenship Question

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Justice Department attorneys are trying to stop Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and DOJ official John Gore from having to testify under oath for the lawsuits over the citizenship question Ross added to the 2020 census. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images