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An injured Tigray People's Liberation Front fighter who was shot in the cheek recovers after surgery at the Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital in Mekele, the capital of Ethiopia's Tigray region. It's the only place in Tigray currently conducting surgery. Elsewhere, "they are stopped because there is no supply, there is no electricity, and there is no fuel," says one Tigray doctor. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

'Where is humanity?' ask the helpless doctors of Ethiopia's embattled Tigray region

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Aleksandra Shchebet Eugenia Zabuga/Aleksandra Shchebet hide caption

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Eugenia Zabuga/Aleksandra Shchebet

The humble bravery of a young neurologist from Kyiv

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A health worker holds an N95 respirator in the emergency room at OakBend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas, in July. N95s are tested and approved by a federal agency as having demonstrated that they can filter out a minimum of 95% of airborne particles. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

An N95 face mask outside NYU Langone Health hospital during the coronavirus pandemic. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Opinion: NFL Fashion Masks But Still Not Enough Protective Masks

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President Donald Trump speaks during a coronavirus task force briefing at the White Houseon Friday. Seated from left, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci, White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx, Surgeon General Jerome Adams, and Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Market And Business Ties Often Determine Where COVID-19 Supplies Go

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Montana Gov. Steve Bullock in Clear Lake, Iowa, last August. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

How 1 State Says It's Being Left Out Of Airlifted Supply Chain

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Security with face masks stand in front of the Signal Iduna Park, where a temporary coronavirus treatment center opened in Dortmund, Germany, Saturday. Germany has the fourth-most COVID-19 cases in the world and demand for medical supplies has skyrocketed. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

In Texas, Oklahoma, Women Turned Away Because Of Coronavirus Abortion Bans

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A Prestige Ameritech employee inspects disposable surgical masks in 2009 at the company's Texas factory. The company is one of the last domestic manufacturers of medical face masks. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Not Enough Face Masks Are Made In America To Deal With Coronavirus

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Jacob Reed, director of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems degree program at Lewis University, demonstrates a drone at the school's airfield outside of Chicago. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

Drone Delivery Is One Step Closer To Reality

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Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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