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Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

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Federica Valabrega

Honduran migrants wait in line to cross over the border checkpoint into Guatemala in Agua Caliente, Honduras. A new caravan of at least several hundred Hondurans has set off toward the United States on foot or in vehicles. Some have already crossed into Guatemala. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Darling Adalid Mercado, 19 (center), left his home in Ocotepeque, Honduras, three months ago to flee town thugs who wanted to recruit him. Guillermo Arias for NPR hide caption

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Guillermo Arias for NPR

A Waiting Game For Immigrants And Border Agents On 2 Sides Of The Wall

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Migrants run as tear gas is thrown by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents to the Mexican side of the border fence after they climbed the fence to get to San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

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Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

U.S. Agents Fire Tear Gas At Migrants Trying To Cross Mexico Border

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When thousands of Hondurans and other Central Americans poured into Tijuana, Aguilar knew he had to do something. "They're from the same streets and cities as us. They're family!" he says. "It wasn't up for discussion, it was simply a matter of going out there and getting these people fed with a taste of home." Tomás Ayuso for NPR hide caption

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Tomás Ayuso for NPR

A group of mostly LGBT Central American migrants are the first to reach northern Mexico. On Sunday about 80 of them arrived in Tijuana. They plan to apply for asylum as early as Thursday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Members of the 89th Military Police and 541st Engineering Company, 19th Engineering Battalion at Fort Knox, Ky., are briefed upon arrival Wednesday at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. They are among some 7,000 troops deploying to the U.S.-Mexican border. Senior Airman Alexandra Minor/Department of Defense hide caption

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Senior Airman Alexandra Minor/Department of Defense

Central American migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., cross from Guatemala into a Mexican border and customs facility in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas, on Wednesday. Edgard Garrido/Reuters hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/Reuters

Migrants heading toward the U.S. carry Honduran and Guatemalan national flags in Guatemala on Monday. President Trump has threatened to cut off aid to Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador for failing to stop the caravan's journey. Orlando Estrada/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Estrada/AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of migrants attempted to cross the border from Guatemala into Mexico this week. Many of the migrants have reportedly returned to their home countries of Honduras and Guatemala. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

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Oliver de Ros/AP

Migrants and day laborers cross the Suchiate River, which divides Mexico and Guatemala. The crossing happens despite immigration officials working on the bridge above. James Frederick for NPR hide caption

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James Frederick for NPR

Mexico Deploys A Formidable Deportation Force Near Its Own Southern Border

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A member of a migrant caravan from Central America kisses a baby as they pray in preparation for an asylum request in the U.S., in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico. Edgard Garrido/REUTERS hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/REUTERS