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"Rosies" pose for a photo at the U.S. Capitol before their Congressional Gold Medal Ceremony on Wednesday. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Real-life 'Rosie the Riveters' reunite in D.C. to win the nation's top civilian honor

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Women leaders are switching jobs at the highest rate in years, the 2022 edition of Women in the Workplace, an annual report from LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Company, found. The authors are calling it "The Great Breakup." onurdongel/Getty Images hide caption

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The pandemic is eroding progress made by women in the workplace, a new report by Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In foundation finds. Dominic Lipinski/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Dominic Lipinski/PA Images via Getty Images

Sheryl Sandberg: Companies Need To 'Lean In' As Pandemic Threatens Women's Progress

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Millions of jobs have been lost as businesses keep their doors closed to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Working women have been hit hardest, accounting for nearly 60% of the early job cuts. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Women Are Losing More Jobs In Coronavirus Shutdowns

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Gaby Gemetti decided to leave the workforce after having her second child. In March she started a "returnship," a new type of program to recruit and retrain women like her who are looking to resume their careers. Here, Gaby and John Gemetti are seen with their children, Carlo and Gianna. Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography hide caption

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Courtesy of Shannon Wight Photography

Hot Job Market Is Wooing Women Into Workforce Faster Than Men

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