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election security

Jared Kushner spoke about Russian election interference during the Time 100 Summit 2019 in New York City. Brian Ach/Getty Images for Time hide caption

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Brian Ach/Getty Images for Time

Russian President Vladimir Putin has thoroughly denied interfering in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, although special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation has uncovered numerous ties to the Russian government. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

In mentioning voting in her Democratic response to the State of the Union, Stacey Abrams (pictured on election night in 2018) voiced what was already becoming increasingly clear: Elections will be a key part of Democratic messaging in the coming years. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

Ahead Of 2020 Election, Voting Rights Becomes A Key Issue For Democrats

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A 2-year-old waits between her father's legs as he and other voters cast their ballots at a polling station set up at Grady High School in Atlanta on Election Day. The state is one of a handful that still use voting machines that don't provide a paper record. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Election officials across the country have worked hard to prioritize security ahead of November's midterms, but some strategies could have the unintended effect of sometimes making voting harder. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla is launching the first statewide effort to combat election-related disinformation. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California Launches New Effort To Fight Election Disinformation

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Voters cast their ballots in August among an array of electronic voting machines in a polling station at the Noor Islamic Cultural Center in Dublin, Ohio. The machines were manufactured by Elections Systems and Software, the largest manufacturer of voting equipment in the country. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

A touchscreen voting machine in Sandy Springs, Ga., during the primary election in May 2018. As the midterm congressional primaries heat up amid warnings of Russian hacking, about 1 in 5 Americans will be casting their ballots on machines that do not produce a paper record of their votes. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Fears about how Russian hackers affected the 2016 election seem to have led a number of Americans to expect a foreign country to affect vote tallies in the midterms. There's no evidence such an attack has ever occurred previously. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

NPR/Marist Poll: 1 In 3 Americans Thinks A Foreign Country Will Change Midterm Votes

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"I think we all still have PTSD from 2016," says Raffi Krikorian, chief technology officer at the Democratic National Committee, referring to the massive hack of DNC emails at a pivotal moment in the presidential election. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A voter in Sandy Springs, Ga. on May 9, 2018. Georgia is one of 14 states that use electronic voting machines that don't produce a paper trail to verify results, which concerns many security experts. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Election Security Becomes A Political Issue In Georgia Governor's Race

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Travis County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir demonstrates how to vote using an analog voting machine in the Travis County Courthouse in downtown Austin. Voting officials around the country are getting federal money to make their voting systems more secure. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

Cyberattackers, traced back to the Vladimir Putin-backed GRU Russian intelligence agency, attempted to hack into the emails of Sen. Claire McCaskill last year. Alexei Nikolsky/Alexei Nikolsky/TASS hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/Alexei Nikolsky/TASS

Russian Hackers Targeted The Most Vulnerable Part Of U.S. Elections. Again

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Ballots in New York City ahead of the 2016 general elections. While U.S. election officials have made progress increasing security, gaps still remain. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Week Of Trump Reversals Puts 2018 Election Security In The Spotlight

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A resident walks in to cast her vote at a polling station in Maine on June 12, in the state's primary elections. Maine is one of 17 states that has yet to apply for election security money allocated this year by congress. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Despite improvements since Russia's attack on the 2016 presidential race, the U.S. elections infrastructure is vulnerable — and will remain so in November. Renee Klahr and Brittany Mayes/NPR hide caption

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Renee Klahr and Brittany Mayes/NPR

Will Your Vote Be Vulnerable On Election Day?

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