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U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Dr. Bert Johansson, an El Paso pediatrician, treats lesions on a migrant man's foot at a makeshift clinic within a local shelter. Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR hide caption

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Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR

It's Easy For Migrants To Get Sick; Harder To Get Treatment

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced a host of "extraordinary protective measures" designed to improve conditions for children and adults held in U.S. Customs and Border Protection custody. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Migrants, one carrying a child, who plan to turn themselves over to U.S. border agents, walk up the embankment after climbing over a U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, last week. On Tuesday, members of the Hispanic Caucus called for improved medical facilities and trained personnel at ports of entry. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Jobs with CBP have been notoriously difficult to fill, in large part because of the polygraph exam applicants are required to undergo. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A group of mostly LGBT Central American migrants are the first to reach northern Mexico. On Sunday about 80 of them arrived in Tijuana. They plan to apply for asylum as early as Thursday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

A border protection officer stands next to a recently upgraded section of fencing at the U.S.-Mexico border in Calexico, Calif., on Friday. The Pentagon says it will send 5,000 U.S. troops to the border. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump with Customs and Border Patrol agent Adrian Anzaldua, whom he praised for finding around 80 immigrants in a tractor-trailer and for his "perfect English." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump's zero tolerance policy left the CBP struggling to process the number of people it detained — and the agency says it will temporarily stop turning immigrant parents over to prosecutors. Here, a mother migrating from Honduras holds her 1-year-old child as she surrenders to border agents on Monday. The two had illegally crossed the border near McAllen, Texas. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Customs And Border Agency Halts Many 'Zero Tolerance' Detentions, Citing Workload

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The Pentagon plans to build temporary camps for detained immigrants. Here, children of detained migrants are seen at a tent encampment near the U.S. Customs and Border Protection port of entry in Tornillo, Texas. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

U.S. Postal Service mail vehicles sit in a parking lot at a mail distribution center on February 18, 2015 in San Francisco, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Deadly Delivery: Opioids By Mail

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