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U.S. Customs and Border Protection

John Sanders (center) has been acting commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection for just over two months. He is expected to make his resignation effective July 5, two officials say. The move comes after hundreds of children were removed from a facility without adequate food and sanitation. Donna Burton/CBP handout via Reuters hide caption

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Donna Burton/CBP handout via Reuters

The entrance of a Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas. U.S. Customs and Border Protection said the agency is removing children from the facility following reports of unsanitary conditions inside. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

U.S. Customs and Border Protection security cameras scan license plates as motor vehicles cross the U.S.-Mexico border from Tijuana, Mexico, in September 2016 in San Ysidro, Calif. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Drivers line up in the border city of Juárez in Mexico's Chihuahua state, as they attempt to cross the border at El Paso, Texas. The Guatemalan consul has confirmed that a Guatemalan boy apprehended with his mother last month had died Tuesday night. Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images

In this 2016 photo, a man holds up his iPhone during a rally in support of data privacy outside the Apple store in San Francisco. Watchdog groups that keep tabs on digital privacy rights are concerned that U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents are searching the phones and other digital devices of international travelers at border checkpoints in U.S. airports. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Migrants run as tear gas is thrown by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents to the Mexican side of the border fence after they climbed the fence to get to San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

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Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

U.S. Agents Fire Tear Gas At Migrants Trying To Cross Mexico Border

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Dr. Bert Johansson, an El Paso pediatrician, treats lesions on a migrant man's foot at a makeshift clinic within a local shelter. Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR hide caption

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Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR

It's Easy For Migrants To Get Sick; Harder To Get Treatment

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced a host of "extraordinary protective measures" designed to improve conditions for children and adults held in U.S. Customs and Border Protection custody. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Migrants, one carrying a child, who plan to turn themselves over to U.S. border agents, walk up the embankment after climbing over a U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, last week. On Tuesday, members of the Hispanic Caucus called for improved medical facilities and trained personnel at ports of entry. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Jobs with CBP have been notoriously difficult to fill, in large part because of the polygraph exam applicants are required to undergo. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A group of mostly LGBT Central American migrants are the first to reach northern Mexico. On Sunday about 80 of them arrived in Tijuana. They plan to apply for asylum as early as Thursday. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

A border protection officer stands next to a recently upgraded section of fencing at the U.S.-Mexico border in Calexico, Calif., on Friday. The Pentagon says it will send 5,000 U.S. troops to the border. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump with Customs and Border Patrol agent Adrian Anzaldua, whom he praised for finding around 80 immigrants in a tractor-trailer and for his "perfect English." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump's zero tolerance policy left the CBP struggling to process the number of people it detained — and the agency says it will temporarily stop turning immigrant parents over to prosecutors. Here, a mother migrating from Honduras holds her 1-year-old child as she surrenders to border agents on Monday. The two had illegally crossed the border near McAllen, Texas. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Customs And Border Agency Halts Many 'Zero Tolerance' Detentions, Citing Workload

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The Pentagon plans to build temporary camps for detained immigrants. Here, children of detained migrants are seen at a tent encampment near the U.S. Customs and Border Protection port of entry in Tornillo, Texas. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters