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opioid addiciton

Esther Nesbitt lost two of her children to drug overdoses, and her grandchildren are among more than 320,000 who lost parents in the overdose epidemic. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

The "Angels of Hope" wall at the office of People Engaged in Recovery holds pictures of people lost to addiction, including a young dad with his baby son and a musician holding two cats. Aneri Pattani/KFF Health News hide caption

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Aneri Pattani/KFF Health News

Can a mathematical model decide best how to spend opioid settlement cash?

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A liquid dose of methadone at the clinic in Rossville, Ga. The medication is only available at designated opioid treatment centers and that won't change. But more clinicians will be able to prescribe it. Kevin D. Liles/AP hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles/AP
LA Johnson/NPR

'I ain't found it yet.' No line this mother won't cross to save her addicted daughter

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Public art in Altoona, Penn., one of many cities hit hard by the opioid epidemic. Marianne Sinisi organized the installation after her son died of an overdose. State and local governments have received about $3 billion so far out of $50 billion total in settlements from national lawsuits. Nancy Andrews/KFF Health News hide caption

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Nancy Andrews/KFF Health News

A bag of assorted pills and prescription drugs is dropped off for disposal during the Drug Enforcement Administration's National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 24, 2021 in Los Angeles. Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images

New book chronicles how America's opioid industry operated like a drug cartel

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Suzanne and Jim Rybak, inside the craft room where their son, Jameson, would encourage Suzanne to make colorful beach bags, received a $4,928 medical bill months after it was supposedly resolved. By Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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By Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News

Suboxone, a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, helps many people addicted to opioids wean themselves from an escalating drug habit. But counseling and social support are key to successful treatment, too, experts say. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone, before graduating to heroin, which is cheaper. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Tales Of Corporate Painkiller Pushing: 'The Death Rates Just Soared'

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Richard Ost owns Philadelphia Pharmacy, in the city's Kensington neighborhood. He says he has stopped carrying Suboxone, for the most part, because the illegal market for the drug brought unwanted traffic to his store. Nina Feldman/WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/WHYY

It's The Go-To Drug To Treat Opioid Addiction. Why Won't More Pharmacies Stock It?

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The best help for patients struggling with addiction, eating disorders or other mental health problems sometimes includes intensive therapy, the evidence shows. But many patients still have trouble getting their health insurers to cover needed mental health treatment. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Authorities intercepted a woman using this drug kit in preparation for shooting up a mix of heroin and fentanyl inside a Walmart bathroom last month in Manchester, N.H. Fentanyl offers a particularly potent high but also can shut down breathing in under a minute. Salwan Georges/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/Washington Post/Getty Images

Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave Begins

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Yvette and Scott, both recovering heroin users, now take methadone daily from a clinic in the Southend of Boston. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

After An Overdose, Patients Aren't Getting Treatments That Could Prevent The Next One

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