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Central American migrants

Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

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Federica Valabrega

Dr. Bert Johansson, an El Paso pediatrician, treats lesions on a migrant man's foot at a makeshift clinic within a local shelter. Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR hide caption

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Monica Ortiz Uribe/NPR

It's Easy For Migrants To Get Sick; Harder To Get Treatment

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Asylum seekers stand at a bus stop after they were dropped off by Immigration and Customs Enforcement at the Greyhound bus station in El Paso, Texas on Dec. 23. Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced a host of "extraordinary protective measures" designed to improve conditions for children and adults held in U.S. Customs and Border Protection custody. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

When thousands of Hondurans and other Central Americans poured into Tijuana, Aguilar knew he had to do something. "They're from the same streets and cities as us. They're family!" he says. "It wasn't up for discussion, it was simply a matter of going out there and getting these people fed with a taste of home." Tomás Ayuso for NPR hide caption

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Tomás Ayuso for NPR

Migrants, one carrying a child, who plan to turn themselves over to U.S. border agents, walk up the embankment after climbing over a U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, last week. On Tuesday, members of the Hispanic Caucus called for improved medical facilities and trained personnel at ports of entry. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Father Of Dead Migrant Says Border Patrol's 'Best Efforts' Couldn't Save Her

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Sara Wong for NPR

Migrant Kids Survive Hardship To Reunite With Parents. Then What?

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Juan Lopez Aguilar (left), a Maya man who fled violence in Guatemala three years ago, tells Dr. Nick Nelson he fears returning to the land of his birth. "There are a lot of gangs," he tells the doctor. "They want to kill people in my community." Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Medical Clinics That Treat Refugees Help Determine The Case For Asylum

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The train known as "The Beast" passes by the Sagrada Familia shelter in Apizaco, Mexico. For many migrants, the train is the next step in their journey north. Alejandro Cegarra for NPR hide caption

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Alejandro Cegarra for NPR

Migrants Are Stuck In Mexico With Violence Back Home And 'Zero Tolerance' In The U.S.

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