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Congress is looking to boost computer chip manufacturing and research in the United States with billions of dollars from the federal government. Jenny Kane/AP file photo hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP file photo

Used cars for sale sit on a lot at a dealership in Doylestown, Pa., last week. Finding a car is still tough, especially for more affordable options. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Why buying a car is still such a miserable experience right now

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One indicator to rule them all

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Star Wars toy accessories are seen at a Target store on October 25, 2021 in Houston, Texas. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Toymakers’ (Supply Chain) Nightmare Before Christmas

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been selected for a second term at the helm of the Fed, a move likely to be welcomed by markets. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Biden reappoints Jerome Powell as Fed chairman at a critical time for the economy

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Revenge of the math club

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A growing number of restaurants are offering produce, dry goods and pantry staples to customers, in addition to their normal menu items. It helps customers buy essential items, provides restaurants with a source of revenue and addresses a sudden disconnect in America's food supply chains. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Max Posner/NPR

A Pound Of Flour To Go? Restaurants Are Selling Groceries Now

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Workers wear protective face masks at the Yanfeng Adient factory in Shanghai, where car seats are assembled, on Feb. 24. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

As New Coronavirus Cases Slow In China, Factories Start Reopening

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An entrance to a dormitory for Foxconn workers. China's factories normally ramp up production right after the Lunar New Year, but few workers have returned so far this year. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

The Wide-Ranging Ways In Which The Coronavirus Is Hurting Global Business

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Shipping containers sit on a Hong Kong-based container ship at the Port of Oakland in California last month. The cost of the tariffs is likely to ripple through the global supply chains that make up much of the trade between the U.S. and China. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Trump Aims Tariffs At Chinese Companies, But Other Firms Will Also Feel The Pain

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