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Russian President Vladimir Putin, shown here at the Kremlin in Moscow on Thursday, said on Friday that Russia should respond in kind to the testing of a new U.S. cruise missile. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, in Bangkok on Friday, said the U.S. withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty is now in effect. "Russia is solely responsible for the treaty's demise," he said. Jonathan Ernst/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin center, attends a meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, left, and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu in the Kremlin in Moscow on Saturday. Putin said that Russia will abandon the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty, what he called a "symmetrical" response to the U.S. decision to withdraw. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

National Security Adviser John Bolton speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin on Tuesday. After their meeting, Bolton told reporters the U.S. still intends to withdraw from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images

President Ronald Reagan, right, and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev sign the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in the White House East Room on December 8, 1987. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

President Ronald Reagan (right) and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev exchange pens during the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty signing ceremony in the White House on Dec. 8, 1987. Gorbachev's translator Pavel Palazhchenko stands in the middle. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Bob Daugherty/AP

A Russian intercontinental ballistic missile is moved during military training in the mid-1990s near Irkutsk, Siberia, Russia. Arms control has been at the center of a decades-long discussion between Russia and the U.S. Associated Press hide caption

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Associated Press

Arms Control Surfaced In Helsinki, But It's Likely Just Talk

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